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I know the question is a bit strange, but I am asking it because I have faced some issues with it. Let me explain it. I have visual studio RTM 2012 installed side by side with VS 2010. According to Microsoft in case of side by side installation of vs 2012 and vs2010 ( http://connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/feedback/details/750762/problems-building-after-installing-vs-2012-rc ) some of Dotnet 4.0 files are replaced with 4.5 version(mscorlib.dll,system.core). I tried virtualizing one application built with vs2012 for dotnet 4.0 using spoon virtual application studio but it showed System.core file not found error. However I replaced the mscorlib.dll and System.Core dlls from the Windows\Microsoft.net\4.0 with \Reference Assemblies\Microsoft\Framework.NETFramework\v4.0 files which fixed the file not found error. But this time it showed a WindowsBase 4.0.0.0/3.0.0.0 file not found error. Thats why I fear that if I run this application in machines where dotnet 4.5 is not installed( winXP machines) may produce error. I don't have a separate machine to test it. Can good folks here confirm this?

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Officially, if you target .NET 4.0, it should work just fine on a .NET 4.0 machine, including Windows XP. If this is NOT the case, it is absolutely a bug. I'm not saying there aren't some incompatibilities between 4.0 & 4.5, but if you find something that works on a 4.5 machine, but it doesn't work on a 4.0 machine, we'll view it as a bug.

As far as the 'not having a WinXP machine to test it on', I'd suggest just running a VM. The testing problem is real, and while most people don't have issues, if you don't test, Murphy's Law would likely apply, and your app wouldn't work :-/

-Kev

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