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How to remove GCC warning on #pragma region ? I added pragma region to easily look at code but it reports warnings on #pragma region. I am using Visual Studio 2010.

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3  
are you compiling with GCC in Visual Studio 2010? –  logoff Oct 15 '12 at 11:16
    
Possibly useful reading: dbp-consulting.com/tutorials/SuppressingGCCWarnings.html –  altendky Oct 15 '12 at 11:25

4 Answers 4

gcc has this warning flag:

-Wunknown-pragmas Warn when a #pragma directive is encountered which is not understood by GCC. If this command line option is used, warnings will even be issued for unknown pragmas in system header files. This is not the case if the warnings were only enabled by the -Wall command line option.

And as per usual you can negate it, meaning unknown pragmas will not be given a warning. That is, use -Wno-unknown-pragmas.

Note that -Wno-unknown-pragmas must come after any command line flags that turn on this warning, such as -Wall - this also disables warnings on all unknown pragmas, so use with care.

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2  
Just to be pedantic, this option turns off warnings for all pragmas, it's not possible to pick and choose which pragmas should generate warnings and which should not. –  Joachim Pileborg Oct 15 '12 at 11:24
    
Yes, @JoachimPileborg, and this diagnostic (unknown-pragmas) can sometimes be life-saving, if you mess up with omp pragmas or the like... –  Tomasz Gandor yesterday

Don't use it on GCC? :)

The simplest solution I can think of at the moment is to use the preprocessor conditionals for it:

#ifndef __GNUC__
#pragma region
#endif

// Stuff...

#ifndef __GNUC__
#pragma endregion
#endif

Not very good looking or readable, but will make the code compile without warnings on GCC.

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Could easily be macro'ed for readability –  altendky Oct 15 '12 at 11:21
1  
@altendky I'm not sure about it, as it's used by the Visual Studio editor to denote regions that can be folded. It depends on how good the Visual Studio editor parser is. –  Joachim Pileborg Oct 15 '12 at 11:25
5  
@altendky - How? a single # (as opposed to ##) inside a macro's replacement-list does not identify a preprocessor directive. It is instead the stringify operator. The thing following the # operator must be a macro parameter name. –  David Hammen Oct 15 '12 at 11:33
2  
If MSVC supports the C99 and C++11 _Pragma operator you could conditionally define a macro to _Pragma("region") when using MSVC and define it to nothing otherwise –  Jonathan Wakely Oct 15 '12 at 20:23
    
Bad idea. When I wrap stuff in a region its so I can collapse it and move it around in the file and keep everything in the region together. Thats kind of the whole point. Wrapping it menas moving it would leave behind little bits of #ifndef and #endif code everywhere and turn into a huge mess. –  Dan Mar 20 at 16:15
#pragma GCC diagnostic push
#pragma GCC diagnostic ignored "-Wunknown-pragmas"
... Code using Unknown pragmas ...
#pragma GCC diagnostic pop
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Since you're also building on Windows you probably want to wrap this in: #ifdef GNUC –  Eric Jun 11 at 20:33

It seems to be a MSVC specific pragma, so you should use

#ifdef _MSC_VER
#pragma region
#endif

<code here>

#ifdef _MSC_VER
#pragma endregion
#endif
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