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There is a file a.py.

The location is /home/user/projects/project1/xxx/a.py.

If I call os.getcwd(), it gives me /home/user/projects/project1/xxx/. But I want to reach /home/user/projects/project1. How can i do this in Python?

Edit : I think i must be more clear. i want this for my Django project.

i use these codes in my settings.py:

PROJECT_PATH = os.path.abspath(os.path.dirname(__file__))

then i use fallowing code to specify where my static file folder is. :

os.path.join(PROJECT_PATH,'statics'),

my settings.py file is under: /home/user/projects/project1/xxx/settings.py

my static file folder is under same dir as settings.py.

now i want to move this folder to /home/user/projects/project1

what should i do with code that in settings.py

thank you

share|improve this question
up vote 7 down vote accepted
>>> import os
>>> os.getcwd()
'/tmp/test'
>>> os.chdir('..')
>>> os.getcwd()
'/tmp'
>>> 

The dot dot (..) represents the parent directory. Because relative path names specify a path starting in the current directory.

See the documentation of os.chdir.

share|improve this answer
    
Consider using os.pardir instead of `'..``. On most systems, they'll be the same thing, but I suppose there might be one or two obscure systems out there where they are different. – mgilson Oct 15 '12 at 12:11
from os.path import dirname

print(dirname(dirname(__file__)))

Each time you call dirname it gives you parent directory. Call as many times as necessary.

Alternatively you can do following:

normpath(join(path1, '..', '..'))
share|improve this answer
3  
Rather than hardcoding '..', consider using os.pardir instead. – mgilson Oct 15 '12 at 12:10

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