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I'm trying to send one object from the server side socket to the client side socket over TCP. I can't find out where is the problem.

Here is the error I'm getting on the Client side:

java.io.EOFException
    at java.io.ObjectInputStream$PeekInputStream.readFully(ObjectInputStream.java:2280)
    at java.io.ObjectInputStream$BlockDataInputStream.readShort(ObjectInputStream.java:2749)
    at java.io.ObjectInputStream.readStreamHeader(ObjectInputStream.java:779)
    at java.io.ObjectInputStream.<init>(ObjectInputStream.java:279)
    at ClientSide.main(ClientSide.java:16)

Code for Server side:

import java.io.*;
import java.net.*;
import java.util.ArrayList;

public class ServerSide {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        try
        {
            ServerSocket myServerSocket = new ServerSocket(9999);
            Socket skt = myServerSocket.accept();   
            ArrayList<String> my =  new ArrayList<String>();
            my.set(0,"Bernard");
            my.set(1, "Grey");
            try 
            {
                ObjectOutputStream objectOutput = new ObjectOutputStream(skt.getOutputStream());
                objectOutput.writeObject(my);               
            } 
            catch (IOException e) 
            {
                e.printStackTrace();
            } 
        }
        catch (IOException e) 
        {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

}

Code for the Client Side:

import java.io.*;
import java.net.InetAddress;
import java.net.Socket;
import java.net.UnknownHostException;
import java.util.ArrayList;


public class ClientSide {

    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        try {       
            Socket socket = new Socket("10.1.1.2",9999);
            ArrayList<String> titleList = new ArrayList<String>();
            try {
                ObjectInputStream objectInput = new ObjectInputStream(socket.getInputStream()); //Error Line!
                try {
                    Object object = objectInput.readObject();
                    titleList =  (ArrayList<String>) object;
                    System.out.println(titleList.get(1));
                } catch (ClassNotFoundException e) {
                    System.out.println("The title list has not come from the server");
                    e.printStackTrace();
                }
            } catch (IOException e) {
                System.out.println("The socket for reading the object has problem");
                e.printStackTrace();
            }           
        } catch (UnknownHostException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }   
    }   
}
share|improve this question
    
Just an advise: Don't send Objects you make over the internet. Only send primitive types. String, Byte, Integer, Float, Double, Char and then convert on either side to the format you want. –  Vipar Oct 15 '12 at 12:15
    
sent multiple strings and then recreate the arraylist, that's better –  Gianmarco Oct 15 '12 at 12:17
    
@ Gianmarco: That's a good idea but still I want to learn how to send an object and also it's part of assignment specification! –  Bernard Oct 15 '12 at 12:20
    
@Bernard The general approach is that you don't send Objects, but just raw data. Then you recreate the data on the end it is received. –  Vipar Oct 15 '12 at 12:23
    
I'd recommend breaking the problem up. Can you successfully serialize and deserialize the ArrayList? No sockets, no client; just write it to the file system and read it back. Once you can do that, then worry about sockets. –  duffymo Oct 15 '12 at 12:25
show 5 more comments

closed as not a real question by duffymo, bensiu, Alex K, Nik Reiman, Graviton Oct 16 '12 at 3:21

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Changing from set to add does the trick

ArrayList<String> my =  new ArrayList<String>();
my.add("Bernard");
my.add("Grey");

ps. as advised by the others this is not a good idea but, use only for learning

share|improve this answer
    
After 1 hour of posting this message I found that the problem was set method after changing it to what you said the program works 100% fine. –  Bernard Oct 15 '12 at 13:16
    
Just wondering, shouldn't your server code have thrown an IndexOutOfBoundsException since you were calling set for non-existent elements? –  Klitos Kyriacou Oct 15 '12 at 13:23
    
@KlitosKyriacou : Unfortunately no. It did not thrown any exception so wasted my 5 hours of time! –  Bernard Oct 15 '12 at 13:28
    
That is because you did not look at the exception thrown when you run ServerSide as, KlitosKyriacou pointed out IndexOutOfBoundsException is indeed thrown which is how I found the solution –  shyam Oct 15 '12 at 13:31
    
@shyam : Well, Now I just double check the program and I realise that there was an IndexOutBoundException exception! which I did not see it before. Because the client side error used to prompted first and I didn't look at the server side :(.... Anyway thanks for your help. ;) –  Bernard Oct 15 '12 at 13:39
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