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Why does C++ not let baseclasses implement a derived class' inherited interface?

#include <iostream>

class Interface
{
public:
    virtual void yell(void) = 0;
};

class Implementation
{
public:
    void yell(void)
    {
        std::cout << "hello world!" << std::endl;
    }
};

class Test: private Implementation, public Interface
{
public:
    using Implementation::yell;
};

int main (void)
{
    Test t;
    t.yell();
}

I want the Test class to be implemented in terms of Implementation, and I want to avoid the need to write the

void Test::yell(void) { Implementation::yell(); }

method. Why it is not possible to do it this way? Is there any other way in C++03?

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marked as duplicate by mfontanini, Bo Persson, Luc Touraille, iammilind, jalf Oct 15 '12 at 14:33

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
@mofntanini: yeah, but since that question has lots of incorrect answers (just tacitly assuming the OP's assertions are correct) it would be much better to vote that other question as a duplicate of this one. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Oct 15 '12 at 13:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

using only brings a name into a scope.

It doesn't implement anything.

If you want Java-like get-implementation-by-inheritance, then you have to explicitly add the overhead associated with that, namely virtual inheritance, like this:

#include <iostream>

class Interface
{
public:
    virtual void yell() = 0;
};

class Implementation
    : public virtual Interface
{
public:
    void yell()
    {
        std::cout << "hello world!" << std::endl;
    }
};

class Test: private Implementation, public virtual Interface
{
public:
    using Implementation::yell;
};

int main ()
{
    Test t;
    t.yell();
}


EDIT: a bit sneaky this feature, I had to edit to make the code compile with g++. Which didn't automatically recognize that the implementation yell and the interface yell were one and the same. I'm not completely sure what the standard says about that!

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the answer. Considering wtfpm only, do you think it is better to do it with virtual inheritance, or I should just make the hierarchy linear with public inheritance? My real hierarchy is the same, only the classes are more complex –  Dadam Oct 15 '12 at 13:03
    
@Dadam: the general rule is first make it correct, and only then make it fast (if necessary). so the general guideline has always been to inherit virtually from interface classes. that helps with exceptions too. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Oct 15 '12 at 13:06
    
In this case, speed is really not a problem, I just want to make it readable (you know wtfpm, don't you?). –  Dadam Oct 15 '12 at 13:13
    
he he, i did, but not that acronym –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Oct 15 '12 at 13:15
    
@Cheersandhth.-Alf - The using is needed because of the private inheritance from Implementation, public inheritance from Interface. The public inheritance from Interface mandates that you have to provide a yell() whose visibility is public to qualify as a non-abstract class. You are inheriting yell() from Implementation, but without the using it's visibility is private. –  David Hammen Oct 15 '12 at 13:35

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