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Background:

1) We are a team of six beginners trying Git and Github for the first time.

2) We created a repo on Github and then all of us cloned it.

3) We then each made our own local feature branches and started working on our first features.

4) Now we have discovered a workflow that uses TWO permanent branches ("master" and "develop") and an arbitrary number of feature branches that come off of "develop" (and go back to it when they are done).

Question:

A) What is the best way to get Github and team repos from the current state of affairs ("master") to what we want ("master" and "develop")?

B) What tracking should each member of the team setup? I.e., we are all interested in staying current with "develop" on Github so we can rebase our feature branches often, for example.

Thanks and sorry if this is a "dumb" question. I feel like the answer is staring me in the face, but I don't have the confidence and would like some help from an experienced Git user, ideally one who uses a workflow similar to what I am taking about. Thanks.

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closed as off topic by Wooble, Abizern, Mac, Stewbob, Kevin Oct 16 '12 at 1:53

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1 Answer 1

Read this article, which beautifully explains how to manage your project with git with multiple developers. I believe the abstract of the article can be presented in this diagram:

git workflow

A) What is the best way to get Github and team repos from the current state of affairs ("master") to what we want ("master" and "develop")?

This is quite easy. Your current master branch is equivalent to the develop branch in the above image. So, you just need to branch off a develop branch and have your developers work with that instead of master.

B) What tracking should each member of the team setup? I.e., we are all interested in staying current with "develop" on Github so we can rebase our feature branches often, for example.

So as far as the develop branch is concerned, you threat it the same way you used to threat master. Barely any difference. Now the master branch is going to be something special. It should be always stable and ready for download by others. As a result, you should give permissions to push to master only to a trusted number of people (I'm not sure if git does that for you, or you just have to tell people and hope they obey). A person who can push to master, would then be responsible for any change in the master branch.

Note that the developers still can issue hotfixes and merge them in develop, but they should let those with privilege to merge them with master.

The release branches could follow a similar but less restrict approach as the master.

One way at least to enforce permissions is to have another repository for master, where the developers can issue "pull requests" and one with permission can accept the pull. This is actually how the Linux kernel is managed. With the Linux kernel, there is a master repository where Linus himself manages. There are a couple of develop branches maintained by his lieutenants and they send him "pull requests" every now and then.

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I have already read that article (see my point #4). That's why I want a "master" and a "develop" branch. My question is how to get there from my current state of affairs. –  chrisco Oct 15 '12 at 13:20
    
@chrisco, see my edit. –  Shahbaz Oct 15 '12 at 13:33

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