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I have a code in abstract class:

public abstract class Job implements Runnable{  
    public void start(Integer jobId) {                      
        try {
            new Thread(this).start();
        } catch (Exception e) {
            e.getMessage();
        }       
    }
}

class code:

public class Test extends Job {

    @Override
    public void run() {
        for(int i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
            try {
                Thread.currentThread();
                Thread.sleep(2000);
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
            System.out.println("TEST");
        }       
    }
}

And in main I have:

public static void main (String[] args) throws MessagingException  
  {
      Test test = new Test();
      test.start(74); 
  }

So how can I pass parameter (jobId) from start method to run()?

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2  
Please work on your accept rate. –  Jesper Oct 15 '12 at 13:26

7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In the Job.start() method, store the value in a member variable, so that you can access it in the run() method later, when the thread is started.

public abstract class Job implements Runnable {
    protected Integer jobId;

    public void start(Integer jobId) {
        this.jobId = jobId;
        try {
            new Thread(this).start();
        } catch (Exception e) {
            e.getMessage();
        }       
    }
}

public class Test extends Job {
    @Override
    public void run() {
        System.out.println(jobId);
    }
}
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You should change that to a constructor parameter, and store it in a field in the derived class.

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Make jobId as member variable of Abstract Class, and in start method, set this variable.
Now this variable will be accessible in run() method.

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Pass the constructor's parameter to the thread:

public class MyThread implements Runnable {

   public MyThread(int parameter) {
   // store parameter for later user
   }

   public void run() {
   }
}

and call like this:

Runnable r = new Thread(new MyThread(param_value)).start();
share|improve this answer

Easiest way. But i am sure that not the best. As i said before this is the easiest way. :)

public abstract class Job implements Runnable{  
    public void start(Integer jobId) {                      
        try {
            // passing jobID
            Test.jobID = this.jobId;
            new Thread(this).start();
        } catch (Exception e) {
            e.getMessage();
        }       
    }
}

And other class..

public class Test extends Job {

   public static Integer jobID;

    @Override
    public void run() {
        for(int i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
            try {
                Thread.currentThread();
                Thread.sleep(2000);
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
            // print jobID
            System.out.println(this.jobID);
        }       
    }
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May I propose you to rethink the way you generate job ids. In all probability you just need a unique id for each new job. The concern of generating that id should reside within your Job class:

public abstract class Job implements Runnable {
  private static final AtomicInteger nextId = new AtomicInteger();
  public final int id = nextId.getAndIncrement();

  ... the rest of your class's code ...
}
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I think you have done the things right.

Just change

  test.start(74);

in your main to

 test.start(new Integer(74));

You can validate it by printing jobId in start method of Job class.

If you want to access the field in run method, define a class variable in "Jobclass and use the same inrun` method.

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