Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an "engine" that asynchronously process tasks and for one task I want to wait until that task is processed.

boost::condition_variable cvWorkDone;

DoSomeWork()
{
   PostAsyncJob(DoWorkAsync)   // is a boost::asio::post

   boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(mtxWorkDoneCv);
   cvWorkDone.wait(lock);
}


DoWorkAsync()
{
   // do some work ...

   cvWorkDone.notify_one();
}

The problem is that the code above has a race condition. What if DoWorkAsync() notifies the boost::condition_variable before DoSomeWork() waits for it ?

I see that boost::condition_variable::wait has a second parameter, a bool that can be used to implement something like this

bool bWait;

DoSomeWork()
{
   bWait = true;
   PostAsyncJob(DoWorkAsync)   // boost::asio::post

   boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(mtxWorkDoneCv);
   cvWorkDone.wait(lock, bWait);
}


DoWorkAsync()
{
   // do some work ...
   boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(mtxWorkDoneCv);
   cvWorkDone.notify_one();      
   bWait = false;
}

but the concurrency is still there ... How can I solve this ?

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Since condition variables don't maintain state about whether they've been signaled or not, you need to maintain the state for whatever might be the reason for the condition variable to be signaled separately (in some cases, such as queues, the reason for a condition variable to be signaled can go away asynchronously). So you might have something like this in your code:

boost::condition_variable cvWorkDone;
bool workdone = false;

DoSomeWork()
{
   PostAsyncJob(DoWorkAsync)   // is a boost::asio::post

   boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(mtxWorkDoneCv);
   while (!workdone) {
      cvWorkDone.wait(lock);
   }
}


DoWorkAsync()
{
   // do some work ...

   {   
      boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(mtxWorkDoneCv);
      workdone = true;
   }
   cvWorkDone.notify_one();
}

Note that this also protects against spurious returns from boost::condition_variable::wait(). From the boost docs on boost::condition_variable::wait():

The thread will unblock when notified by a call to this->notify_one() or this->notify_all(), or spuriously.

share|improve this answer
    
Why is this solving the concurrency issue ? workdone = true; and cvWorkDone.notify_one(); can execute before !workdone and vWorkDone.wait(lock);. And the main thread will wait for a notify_one that will never come. –  cprogrammer Oct 15 '12 at 15:06
    
The thread will unblock when notified by a call to this->notify_one() or this->notify_all(), or spuriously. doesn't sound good at all. –  cprogrammer Oct 15 '12 at 15:18
    
This solves the concurrency problem because workdone is updated and checked only while holding the mutex. The waiter can only get to the cvWorkDone.wait(lock) statement if and only if DoAsyncWork() has not yet reached the workdone = true statement. Conversely, if DoWorkAsync() sets workdone = true before the waiter reaches the while (!workdone), then the waiter will notice that workdone has been set, and won't bother waiting on the condition variable. To reiterate, there's no race there because the threads have to acquire mutex to set or check workdone. –  Michael Burr Oct 15 '12 at 18:23
    
boost::condition_variable::wait() can have spurious wake ups because that's the common behavior for the underlying system mechanism used by boost. For a rationale for why condition variables might behave this way, see stackoverflow.com/questions/8594591/… So in general, you need to loop on the condition that the condition variable 'signals'. –  Michael Burr Oct 15 '12 at 18:27
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.