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One of my methods accepts an out int i as a parameter. I need to get the value of this variable and assign it to a local variable.

Consider the following simple console application which demonstrates the issue:.

class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Other o = new Other();
            int i = 5; 
            o.Demo(out i);
            Console.WriteLine(i);
            Console.ReadKey();
        }
    }

    class Other
    {
        public void Demo(out int i)
        {
            // i = 10; Uncomment this to fix it (although this would not be an option)
            int k = i;            
        }
    }

I cannot assign the variable i to k (in the Demo method). Does any one have an explanation (and a work around :) ).

EDIT

The above is just a contrived example of what I'm trying to do: in live, the problem is I'm re-writting code and at this stage, I'm not able to change the "out" as it's one of the parameters of the constructor which is referenced by many, many other projects! I assume this may mean I'm stuffed

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2  
In this example, you do not need the out keyword. The usage of out on the int i parameter of Demo() requires that i be defined within that function before it returns. –  Cory Oct 15 '12 at 13:34
1  
Why are you using out at all in this example? –  Oded Oct 15 '12 at 13:34
    
Just to provide a simple, easy on the eye version of what I'm doing - my actual project is vast - in the above example I wouldn't use out, it's just to show that I'm trying to push the out value to a local variable. –  Dave Oct 15 '12 at 13:35
    
You cannot assign i to k because it is an out. Why can you not change to ref? Or, if you need to access the value of a variable only in some cases, perhaps you need an overload. –  Dan Puzey Oct 15 '12 at 13:37
1  
@DaveRook: what about creating an overload that passes the value in, instead of trying to re-use the same parameter? –  Dan Puzey Oct 15 '12 at 13:38

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The point of out is that you must assign a value to the passed in out variable.

If, as your comments suggests, this is not an option, then you should not be using out for this.

In order to assign the value, just pass in the value as normal:

class Other
{
    public void Demo(int i)
    {
        int k = i;            
    }
}

Now that you have clarified your use case, I would say that you still need to refactor the out from the constructor. To start, look at overloading the constructor - have an overload that you can use without out and start changing the call sites to the one with out parameters until you have cleared them all out.

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I totally agree - the problem is I'm re-writting code and at this stage, I'm not able to change the "out" as it's one of the parameters of the constructor which is referenced by many, many other projects! I assume this may mean I'm stuffed! –  Dave Oct 15 '12 at 13:37
    
@DaveRook - You will need to remove the out from the constructor and all call sites, or provide an overload that doesn't have out, at least to start with (possibly with a different parameter type/order/number so overload resolution can work). –  Oded Oct 15 '12 at 13:39
    
@DaveRook - You really should have stated pretty much your whole comment as part of the question. It is vital context - instead of getting so many answers as to the why and "don't do that", you would have gotten something more pertinent. –  Oded Oct 15 '12 at 13:40
    
= yes, I have updated now to reflect this; Sorry, sometimes it's hard to write a good question and takes a few attempts (sadly at other people's time - apologies) –  Dave Oct 15 '12 at 13:43

The reason for this will be more obvious if we change to:

Other o = new Other();
int i;
o.Demo(out i);
Console.WriteLine(i);

You'll notice that i is not "definitely assigned" before the call, and is "definitely assigned" after the call. More generally, as a consequence, an out parameter is not "definitely assigned" on entry to a method body. You must assign a value to the parameter:

  • before you try to read it (if at all)
  • before exit (excluding exceptions)

If you want to pass a value in as well, use ref instead of out.

Note that technically ref and out are identical in terms of implementation; the special treatment of definite assignment is a compiler feature, intended to avoid us having to initialize with dummy values, for example:

int i = 0; // why zero? this zero is useless and never used!
if(int.TryParse(s, out i)) {...}

better:

int i;
if(int.TryParse(s, out i)) {...}
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Well, out means that the variable comes into the method uninitialized, so it must be initialized before you use it.

The meaning of out is that the variable is set by the procedure. For your code, it's essentially the same as

int Demo()
{
    return ...;
}

Note that returning the value as in the example above is usually preferred over returning through out parameter.

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Hence why REF would be better I assume? –  Dave Oct 15 '12 at 13:38
    
@Dave: depends on what you are going to achieve. ref means that the variable comes in initialized, and its changes are visible outside as well. –  Vlad Oct 15 '12 at 13:39
1  
@DaveRook No, in this context it shouldn't be out or ref, it should just be a regular pass-by-value. –  Servy Oct 15 '12 at 13:49

The point of out is that the value is coming out of the method, not going in. The reason why the c# compiler is preventing you from doing this is exactly the same reason that it prevents the following from compiling - i is uninitialised

int i; int k = i;

If you want to pass a value into this method using this parameter then you need to either use ref (so that a value is passed in and out), or just remove the out entirely (so that a value is only passed into this method)

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That is the whole point of out. You must assign a value to it before the function returns. If you don't like this behavior, either skip it entirely or use the ref keyword instead.

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