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In MapReduce papers is described that input files are partitioned in M input splits. I know the HDFS in Hadoop makes partitioning automatically to blocks of 64 MB (default) and then replicate these blocks to few other nodes in cluster for providing fault tolerance. I'd like to know if this partitioning of files in HDFS means the input splitting described in mentioned MapReduce papers. Is fault tolerance single reason of this splitting or are there more important reasons?

And what if I have MapReduce over cluster of nodes without distributed file system (data only on local disks with common file sytem)? Do I need to split input files on local disk before map phase?

Thank you for your answers.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Would Like to Add few Missing concept (ans is confusing for me )



HDFS

A file is stored as blocks(Fault/Node Torrance) .The block size (64MB-128MB) 64MB . So a file is divided in blocks , blocks are stored on different Nodes on cluster . A block is being replicated by a replication factor(default =3).

Map-Reduce

The file which is already stored in HDFS is logically divided into INPUT-SPLITS . The splits size can be set by the user

Property name           Type   Default value

mapred.min.split.size   int     1
mapred.max.split.sizea  long    Long.MAX_VALUE.

And then the split size is calculated by the formula:

max(minimumSize, min(maximumSize, blockSize))

NOTE:: The Split are logical



Hope to ans your questions now

 I'd like to know if this partitioning of files in HDFS means the input splitting described in mentioned MapReduce papers. 

NO , Not at all HDFS blocks and Map-Reduce splits are not at all same thing

Is fault tolerance single reason of this splitting or are there more important reasons?

No , Distributed computing will be the reason .

And what if I have MapReduce over cluster of nodes without distributed file system (data only on local disks with common file sytem)? Do I need to split input files on local disk before map phase?

In your case ,I Guess ,Yes you will have to split the input-file for Map Phase , and also you will have to split the intermediate output(from Mapper) for Reduce Phase. Other prob : consistency of Data,Fault tolerance,Data Loss(in hadoop its =1%).

Map-Reduce is made for Distributed Computing , so using Map-Reduce in Non-Distributed environment is not useful.

Thanks

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1  
Thanks for your detailed answer. I already understand to most my problems but your answer on my last question is still unclear for me. Maybe there is a problem which still I can't see. I understand to the splitting problem, so I can change my last question to only: "Is possible to have MapReduce over cluster of nodes without distributed file system?" I mean that I have cluster for example of 20 nodes with the same scheme of data but these data are not stored on local disk with distibuted file system(HDFS, GFS) but on local disk with NTFS (or ext3 or NTFS or any other no distributed FS). –  babusek Oct 16 '12 at 10:49
    
I don't talk about Hadoop but about general MapReduce model. –  babusek Oct 16 '12 at 10:52
    
I know that in example cluster described in previous comment there will be no automatic replication (if it isn't implemented) and other advantages of distributed file system but I'd like to know if there are other (for me unknown) problems to have MapReduce over described cluster. –  babusek Oct 16 '12 at 10:59
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In your case ,I Guess ,Yes you will have to split the input-file for Map Phase , and also you will have to split the intermediate output(from Mapper) for Reduce Phase. Other prob : consistency of Data,Fault tolerance,Data Loss(in hadoop its =1%). –  saurabh shashank Oct 16 '12 at 11:17
I'd like to know if this partitioning of files in HDFS means the input splitting described in mentioned MapReduce papers.

No, the input splitting in MapReduce is to take advantage of the computing capacity of multiple processors during the reduce phase. The mapper takes in a large amount of data and splits the data into logical partitions (most of the times as specified by the custom implementation of the mapper by the programmer). This data then goes to individual nodes where independent processes called reducers perform the data crunching and then, the result gets collated in the end.

Is fault tolerance single reason of this splitting or are there more important reasons?

No, it is not the single reason for doing so. You can compare it to the file-system level block size for ensuring transfer of data into chunks, compression of data on a per-block basis and allocation of I/O buffers.

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Thanks for your answer but I don't clearly understand the answer in first paragraph. "The mapper takes in a large amount of data and splits the data" - so the mapper first splits input files to M splits and then on N map-worker nodes is performed overall M processes with map function where one process produce one sorted and partitioned file with intermediate key:value pairs? And then partitions in these files are send to corresponding reducers? –  babusek Oct 15 '12 at 14:51
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The output of the map may not necessarily be sorted. It depends on the logic you are implementing in your mappers. Rest "so the mapper first splits input files to M splits and then on N map-worker nodes is performed overall M processes with map function where one process produce one sorted and partitioned file with intermediate key:value pairs? And then partitions in these files are send to corresponding reducers" - Yes, this is true. –  Abhishek Jain Oct 15 '12 at 15:42
    
Thank you very much. –  babusek Oct 15 '12 at 15:44

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