Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am going nuts with the Encoding schemes now. I will state my problem below, please give your inputs.

Problem : I have some input string as mentioned in code below. The final desired output is "Křižovnická 190".[ You can decode it here ]. I am using perl modules to decode these kind of strings. Following is my test code :

use HTML::Entities;
binmode STDOUT,":utf8";
$a = "Křižovnická 190";
decode_entities($a);
print $a."\n";

However the output, I am getting is "Křiovnická 19" which means that "ř" is decoded properly, but "ž" is not. My question is WHY? I then tried "_decode_entities" method where we supply entity2char hash, but still no success.

PS : I am bound to use Perl here, because of other legacy APIs, please help me here

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

ž does not refer to "ž". it's U+009E PRIVACY MESSAGE, a control character. (15810 = 9E16)

"ž" is U+017E LATIN SMALL LETTER Z WITH CARON, so the escape would be ž or ž.

Some web browsers interpret numerical entities with a of value in 80..9F16 (128..15910) incorrectly, treating the number as the Windows-1252 encoding of the Unicode code point.

| Grapheme           |         ř         |         ž         |
+--------------------+-------------------+-------------------+
| Unicode Code Point | U+0159 (345)      | U+017E (382)      |
| Escape             | ř (ř) | ž (ž) |
+--------------------+-------------------+-------------------+
| cp1252 encoding    | ---               | 9E (158)          |
| Alternate escape*  | ---               | ž (ž)   |

* — Non-standard and buggy behaviour.

This buggy behaviour is the one you desire. I don't see a module implementing that behaviour, so we'll have to code our own.

use strict;
use warnings;
use open ':std', ':encoding(UTF-8)';

use HTML::Entities qw( );
use Encode         qw( decode );

{
    my %fixes =
        map { chr($_) => decode('cp1252', chr($_)) }
          0x80..0x9F;

    sub decode_entities {
        my $s_ref = defined(wantarray())
            ? do { my ($s) = @_; \$s }
            : \$_[0];

        $$s_ref =~ s{(
            &\#
            (?: 0*([1-9][0-9]*);?
            |   x0*([1-9A-Fa-f][0-9A-Fa-f]*);?
            )
        )}{
            if (defined($2) && length($2) == 3 && exists($fixes{chr($2)})) {
               $fixes{chr($2)}
            } elsif (defined($3) && length($3) == 2 && exists($fixes{chr(hex($3))})) {
               $fixes{chr(hex($3))}
            } else {
               $1
            }
        }exg;

        HTML::Entities::decode_entities($$s_ref);
        return $$s_ref;        
    }
}

print(decode_entities("Křižovnická 190"), "\n");
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot @ikegami. Your code is working perfectly fine. –  Code4Fun Oct 16 '12 at 14:01
add comment

The character "ž" corresponds to ž in Unicode, not ž. 158 is the encoding of "ž" in cp1252.

BTW, Clementinum is nice.

For clarity:

| Grapheme   |         ř         |         ž         |
|------------+-------------------+-------------------|
| Codepoint  | U+0159 (345)      | U+017E (382)      |
| Escape     | ř (ř) | ž (ž) |
|------------+-------------------+-------------------|
| UTF-8      | C5 99 (197 153)   | C5 BE (197 190)   | 
| cp1252     | -                 | 9E    (158)       |
| latin2     | F8    (248)       | BE    (190)       |

Update:

See HTML Decimal Character Rendering at Wikipedia for details. The important part is:

(...) references to characters 128–159 are commonly interpreted by lenient web browsers as if they were references to the characters assigned to bytes 128–159 (decimal) in the Windows-1252 character encoding. This is in violation of HTML and SGML standards, and the characters are already assigned to higher code points, so HTML document authors should always use the higher code points. For example, for the trademark sign (™), use ™, not ™.

share|improve this answer
    
But Choroba, the actial string is "Křižovnická 190" and the legacy system has stored "ž" as &#158 which I guess is latin encoding. How do I decode it back to original string is my concern –  Code4Fun Oct 15 '12 at 14:40
    
On htmlentities.com &#158 as well as &#382 give same character. Why is there duplicate code for same character –  Code4Fun Oct 15 '12 at 14:46
    
The legacy system uses utf-8 encoding of ř and cp1250 encoding of ž. Latin-2 (or iso-8859-2) for ř and ž is 248 and 190, respectively. –  choroba Oct 15 '12 at 14:46
    
There was major confusion between Unicode code points and UTF-8. Fixed. –  ikegami Oct 15 '12 at 16:07
    
@ikegami: Thanks. –  choroba Oct 15 '12 at 16:19
show 4 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.