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I have developed this custom ImageView class to override some of the default behavior to fit my needs. Let me describe what this custom ImageView does...

Let's say you have a bunch of icons to display in GridView both in the drawable-mdpi and drawable-hdpi folder, they are 48x48px and 72x72px in size, respectively. There are no icons available in the drawable-xhdpi folder. The GridView attributes are so that all the icons size will be in 48x48dp (this will translate to 48px, 72px and 96px for mpdi, hdpi and xhdpi densities, respectively).

Since there are no icons in the drawable-xhdpi folder, when this app is ran on a device with such density, the icons will be pulled from the drawable-hdpi folder. And since they are only 72px and the xhdpi devices are expecting 96px images, the icons will be stretched to fill the remaining pixels.

This is the behavior my custom ImageView attempts to override. With my custom component, what will happen is that the images will simply not get stretched. For instance, in the example above using my class, each ImageView inside the GridView will still be 96x96px (because of the 48x48dp size defined) but the images used are from the drawable-hdpi folder which are 72x72px. What will happen is that these images from the drawable-hdpi folder will be placed in the center of the ImageView which is 96x96px in size without stretching the image to fit the whole view size.

If the above is confusing, let's try with a few pictures. The example below does not use GridView, I'm trying to simplify the idea behind my custom class. These are the source pictures I'm using for this example:

source-files

This is the result on HDPI device:

hdpi-demo

And this is the result on XHDPI device:

xhdpi-demo

The code for the layout on the screenshots above is this:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<LinearLayout
    xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:layout_width="match_parent"
    android:layout_height="match_parent"
    android:layout_margin="10dp"
    android:orientation="vertical">

    <TextView
        android:layout_width="match_parent"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:text="Standard ImageView:"
        android:textAppearance="?android:attr/textAppearanceLarge"/>

    <ImageView
        android:layout_width="48dp"
        android:layout_height="48dp"
        android:layout_margin="10dp"
        android:scaleType="center"
        android:background="#FFEEEE"
        android:src="@drawable/ic_female"/>
    <ImageView
        android:layout_width="48dp"
        android:layout_height="48dp"
        android:layout_margin="10dp"
        android:scaleType="center"
        android:background="#FFEEEE"
        android:src="@drawable/ic_male"/>

    <TextView
        android:layout_width="match_parent"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:text="Custom UnscaledImageView:"
        android:textAppearance="?android:attr/textAppearanceLarge"/>

    <com.sampleapp.widget.UnscaledImageView
        android:layout_width="48dp"
        android:layout_height="48dp"
        android:layout_margin="10dp"
        android:scaleType="center"
        android:background="#FFEEEE"
        android:src="@drawable/ic_female"/>
    <com.sampleapp.widget.UnscaledImageView
        android:layout_width="48dp"
        android:layout_height="48dp"
        android:layout_margin="10dp"
        android:scaleType="center"
        android:background="#FFEEEE"
        android:src="@drawable/ic_male"/>

</LinearLayout>

Is it more clear now? This is what I want to do and this is working nicely, besides a small performance issue... Now let me post the code I'm using for such custom component:

attrs.xml:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<resources>

    <declare-styleable name="UnscaledImageView">
        <attr name="android:src" />
    </declare-styleable>

</resources>

UnscaledImageView.java:

public class UnscaledImageView extends ImageView {

    private int mDeviceDensityDpi;

    public UnscaledImageView(Context context) {
        super(context);

        mDeviceDensityDpi = getResources().getDisplayMetrics().densityDpi;
    }

    public UnscaledImageView(Context context, AttributeSet attrs) {
        super(context, attrs);

        mDeviceDensityDpi = getResources().getDisplayMetrics().densityDpi;

        TypedArray styledAttrs = context.obtainStyledAttributes(attrs, R.styleable.UnscaledImageView);
        int resourceId = styledAttrs.getResourceId(R.styleable.UnscaledImageView_android_src, 0);

        if(resourceId != 0) {
            setUnscaledImageResource(resourceId);
        }

        styledAttrs.recycle();
    }

    public void setUnscaledImageResource(int resId) {
        setImageBitmap(decodeBitmapResource(resId));
    }

    @SuppressWarnings("deprecation")
    public void setUnscaledBackgroundResource(int resId) {
        BitmapDrawable drawable = new BitmapDrawable(null, decodeBitmapResource(resId));
        drawable.setTargetDensity(mDeviceDensityDpi);
        drawable.setGravity(Gravity.CENTER);

        setBackgroundDrawable(drawable);
    }

    private Bitmap decodeBitmapResource(int resId) {
        BitmapFactory.Options options = new BitmapFactory.Options();
        options.inDensity = mDeviceDensityDpi;

        return BitmapFactory.decodeResource(getResources(), resId, options);
    }

}

So, this class will do it's thing if the UnscaledImageView view is used in XML layouts or directly initialized in code. I've also provided 2 methods so the image can be changed in code while keeping it from being stretched. As you can see, these methods only take resource ids, so far I haven't felt the need to use drawables or bitmaps directly.

Now the real issue I'm having with this...

If this class is used as single image view in some layout, no problem, it's only decoding one image. But if it's used in a GridView where there can be like 40 icons (I'm taking this value from what really happens on my app running on my xhdpi device) visible at the same time, scrolling the GridView will be very slow because the decodeBitmapResource() is calling BitmapFactory.decodeResource() for each and every image.

This is my problem and that is my question. How can I optimize this? If possible, at all...

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I don't really see a need for a custom ImageView as you can use the standard one with an appropriate ScaleType –  Rajesh Oct 15 '12 at 14:35
    
@Rajesh Nope, that doesn't do the same thing this class does. I developed this class because neither option available in the standard ImageView did what I wanted (especially the ScaleType attribute). –  Ricardo Amaral Oct 15 '12 at 14:37
    
Maybe I am missing the point, but how about creating a layout XML with gravity center and containing an ImageView that has scaleType set to center? Can you please share your GridView layout and getView code of your adapter? –  Rajesh Oct 15 '12 at 14:43
    
@Rajesh Again, that does not do what I'm doing with this class. The GridView layout and the adapter are irrelevant. The GridView is what I'm using on my app but I might as well have a bunch of individual ImageView's on a LinearLayout and the problem would be the same. I don't really know how to explain the issue better than what I did on the question. I took my my time to write it properly... If you still don't understand it, I don't know how else to put it. –  Ricardo Amaral Oct 15 '12 at 17:39
    
One thing that I just remembered I missed explaining... I gave an example where there are some images in the mdpi/hdpi folders but not on the xhdpi. But in some other cases/images, a specific image might also exist on the xhdpi folder. This custom ImageView adapts to that. You can't do that only with XML and the standard ImageView. –  Ricardo Amaral Oct 15 '12 at 17:42
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2 Answers

Putting those images into the res/drawable-nodpi/ could do what you want (I'm saying to put different resolution images side by side).

It would be a bit tricky because probably you'd have to follow a naming convention to be able to find the best resource for a given image that you are trying to draw. Probably this will require you to try finding images by their name and that's not a very efficient way to retrieve resources.

The way I imagin this is: on the layout (or anywhere else), you specify the name (string, not id!) of the image resource you want to use.

In that nodpi folder, you'd have the images with a suffix for the intended screen density.

Then, in the setter method you have to try different combinations in order to find the best available resource.

Problem for you to think: what if you're scaling down an image? The resource would be bigger than the view where you'd draw it!

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Finding images by name may not be the most efficient way to retrieve resources, but it's a hell of a lot better than trying to decode them all on the fly while scrolling. –  Geobits Oct 16 '12 at 0:52
    
That's an idea... I'll have to think about it and test it out. As for your last paragraph, that's a non issue in this specific scenario, images will never be scaled down. –  Ricardo Amaral Oct 16 '12 at 1:13
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Although the answer by Pedro Loureiro could be a possible solution, I decided to take a different approach after realizing something...

I've timed both the native ImageView loading and my UnscaledImageView loading in a GridView, non-scientifically of course and I've realized that my class loads all the images a little bit faster than the native one. Maybe the native methods have something else going on, besides decoding the resource (they still have to do it, right?) while my class simply decodes a resource (using BitmapFactory) and that's basically it.

I thought that it was my class that was making the GridView kinda slow while scrolling but after a few more tests, using the original ImageView without any tweaks, also revealed to be a little choppy while scrolling the GrivView.

The solution I found to solve this issue (either with my class or the native one) was to cache the icons in the GridView and for that I used the LruCache which is the recommended way of caching images in a GridView.

So that's the solution I'll be using to solve my issue. For more details please refer to the official training guide: http://developer.android.com/training/displaying-bitmaps/cache-bitmap.html

For reference, I've also found the following tutorial useful: http://andrewbrobinson.com/2012/03/05/image-caching-in-android/

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