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Is that possible to perform commit in the method that is marked as Spring's @Transactional?

@PersistenceContext
private EntityManager em;

@Transactional(propagation = Propagation.REQUIRED)
public void saveMembersWithMultipleCommits(List<Member> members)
    throws HibernateException
{
    Iterator<Member> it = members.iterator();
    while (it.hasNext())
    {
        while (it.hasNext())
        {
            Member wsBean = it.next();
            em.persist(wsBean); // overall commit will be made after method exit
            log.info("Webservices record " + wsBean + " saved. " + i++);
        }
    }
}

I would like to have commit to DB after say each 500 items. Is that possible with aforementioned context?

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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

No, you need to do it programatically using, for instance, the TransactionTemplate API. Read more here.

It would look something like

while (it.hasNext())
{
    transactionTemplate.execute(new TransactionCallbackWithoutResult() {
        protected void doInTransactionWithoutResult(TransactionStatus status) {
            int counter = 0;
            while (it.hasNext() && counter++ < 500) {
                Member wsBean = it.next();
                em.persist(wsBean);
                log.info("Webservices record " + wsBean + " saved. " + i++);
            }
        }
    );
}
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So I will have a new connection to DB for each callback? –  Michael Z Oct 15 '12 at 16:23
    
@MichaelZ no, just a new transaction. –  pap Oct 16 '12 at 6:49
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Your question suggests that you have misplaced your transaction boundary.

You can move the persist call into a private method and make that method transactional instead of the outer one. This method could accept 500 members at a time and then will commit when it exits.

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1  
Requires load-time or compile-time weaving, won't work with Springs "standard" proxy-based weaving. –  pap Oct 18 '12 at 6:51
    
Yes this is true. –  Alex Oct 18 '12 at 12:29
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If you are looking forward to committing transactionally inside your other transaction, you might need to use @Transactional (propagation = Propagation.REQUIRES_NEW)

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Will I have the new one connection to DB be opened for second @Transactional method invocation or it will be the same connection? –  Michael Z Oct 15 '12 at 16:13
    
This is a totally separated transaction but the connection is the same. Check it for yourself. I might be making a mistake. –  Matin Kh Oct 15 '12 at 16:57
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Alternate strategy is you create a method in DAO and mark it @Transactional. This method will do bulk update(for eg 500 nos). So you can have a method with code

@Transactional

public void mybatchUpdateMethod(){

    StatelessSession session = this.hibernateTemplate.getSessionFactory()
            .openStatelessSession();

    Transaction transaction = null;

    Long entryCounter = 0L;

    PreparedStatement batchUpdate = null;
    try {
        transaction = session.beginTransaction();
        batchUpdate = session.connection().prepareStatement(insertSql);

        for (BatchSnapshotEntry entry : entries) {
            entry.addEntry(batchUpdate);
            batchUpdate.addBatch();

            if (++entryCounter == 500) {
                // Reached limit for uncommitted entries, so commit
                batchUpdate.executeBatch();
            }
        }

        batchUpdate.executeBatch();
        batchUpdate.close();
        batchUpdate = null;
    }
    catch (HibernateException ex) {
        transaction.rollback();
        transaction = null;
    }
}

Every time you call this method, it will commit after 500 inserts/updates

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And what is hibernateTemplate here? What class? –  Michael Z Oct 17 '12 at 12:42
    
Sorry. should have clarified. I am giving example of spring with hibernate and using hibernateTemplate. You are using EntityManager which is with JPA and can use that. You can do this Session session = entityManager.unwrap(Session.class); The session is hibernate session –  vsingh Oct 17 '12 at 13:28
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