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I have the following Javascript code, and I'm trying to get a callback to work as shown below. I want to see an alert with "123" in it.

var A = function(arg){
    this.storedArg = arg;
    this.callback = function(){ alert(this.storedArg); }
}

var B = function() {
    this.doCallback = function(callback){ callback(); }
}       

var pubCallback = function(){ alert('Public callback') };

var a = new A(123);
var b = new B();

b.doCallback(pubCallback); // works as expected
b.doCallback(a.callback);  // want 123, get undefined

I understand what is happening but I'm not sure how to fix it. How can I get a callback function that references my a object? In my case, I can make changes to A but not B.

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Have you tried just alert(arg) ? –  Ja͢ck Oct 15 '12 at 14:53
    
@Jack, I don't think the end goal is showing an alert. –  andytuba Oct 15 '12 at 14:55

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

So what you want is to pass the context to the doCallBack.

E.g.

doCallBack = function (callback, callee) { 
    callback.apply(callee);
}

So then you would do:

b.doCallBack(a.callback, a);

If you cannot modify the B then you can use closure inside A:

var A = function (arg) {
    var self = this;
    this.storedArg = arg;
    this.callback = function () { alert(self.storedArg); }
}
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This would require modifying the B class, right? Unfortunately, I cannot do this. –  Watusimoto Oct 15 '12 at 14:59
    
@Watusimoto I have added a second version for when you cannot modify B –  Konstantin D - Infragistics Oct 15 '12 at 15:03

You can create a variable that holds the wanted scope for this by putting it into variable that

var A = function(arg){
    this.storedArg = arg;
    var that = this; // Add this!
    this.callback = function(){ alert(that.storedArg); }
}

Working demo here: http://jsfiddle.net/vdM5t/

share|improve this answer

I understand what is happening (during the 2nd callback, "this" is b and not a)

No, JS is no class-based language where something could happen. If function(){ alert(this.storedArg); is just called as callback(); (like in b.doCallback), the this keyword points to the global object (window).

To get around that, you'd have to change A to

var A = function(arg){
    var that = this; // store reference to the current A object
    this.storedArg = arg;
    this.callback = function(){
        alert(that.storedArg); // and use that reference now instead of "this"
    };
}

If you don't expect the storedArg property to change, you could even make it more simple:

var A = function(arg){
    this.storedArg = arg;
    this.callback = function(){
        alert(arg); // just use the argument of the A function,
                    // which is still in the variable scope
    };
}
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Yes, you are correct; I had done some logging that showed this == b, but my statement did not make it clear where I had observed that. –  Watusimoto Oct 15 '12 at 15:18

You need to pass the context you want the callback to execute in:

var B = function() {
    this.doCallback = function(callback, context) {
        callback.apply(context); 
    };
};

b.doCallback(a.callback, a); // 123

http://jsfiddle.net/a9N66/

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Because inside A.callback function, this does not refer to A but to window object.

var A = function(arg){
    this.storedArg = arg;
    this.callback = function(){ alert(this.storedArg); }
    -----------------------------------^-----------------
}

You can try this,

var A = function(arg){
    this.storedArg = arg;
    var that = this;
    this.callback = function(){ alert(that.storedArg); }
}

var B = function() {
    this.doCallback = function(callback){ callback(); }
}       

var pubCallback = function(){ alert('Public callback') };

var a = new A(123);
var b = new B();

b.doCallback(pubCallback); // works as expected
b.doCallback(a.callback);  // alerts 123
share|improve this answer
    
this does not refer to A.callback (which btw does not exist), and neither should it refer to A. –  Bergi Oct 15 '12 at 14:58

When you do this:

b.doCallback(a.callback);

that just calls a's callback function without telling it to use a for this; so the global object is used for this.

One solution is to wrap that callback up:

b.doCallback(function() { a.callback(); });

Other solutions include binding the callback to a, using jQuery.proxy() (which is just a fancy way of doing my first solution), or passing in a to doCallback and invoking callback on a using apply.

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