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I have 2 Java installed on my machine. 1.5 and 1.6. For the project, I need 1.5. I have set all of my path variables to appropriate i.e.

echo %JAVA_HOME%
<PATH_TO_1.5_JDK>

which is what i want .. but when i do

java -version
java version "1.6.0_33"
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.6.0_33-b05)
Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM (build 20.8-b03, mixed mode)

why java v 6 is being picked for java -version command ?

UPDATED I have already checked the %PATH% variable and the only java version that appears in path is 1.5. I am referring to SYSTEM VARIABLES variable here and I am using Win7

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3  
have you check the PATH variable? –  Azuan Oct 15 '12 at 15:08
    
What operating system do you use? –  André Stannek Oct 15 '12 at 15:11
    
Did you echo %PATH% in the same terminal that reports java version 1.6? –  pb2q Oct 15 '12 at 15:27
    
Yes. I first ran echo %JAVA_HOME% which reported v 1.5 and then i ran the command java -version in the same terminal and it reported v 6 –  Em Ae Oct 15 '12 at 15:51

4 Answers 4

Java 6 is picked because it comes first in you PATH environment variable. It has nothing to do with JAVA_HOME variable, until and unless you specify you PATH variable using JAVA_HOME variable

Setting a new USER variables PATH as JAVA_HOME\bin, will solve your problem

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I updated my question –  Em Ae Oct 15 '12 at 15:23
    
Yeah!!! Same problem here, solved setting a new USER variable JAVA_HOME as <PATH_JDK> –  Kummo Oct 30 '12 at 13:05

If you're running the java command on the command-line, the important environment variable is %PATH%: if the path to the JDK-1.6 bin directory precedes the path to the 1.5 bin directory on your path, then running java on the command line will use the 1.6 version.

The JAVA_HOME environment variable is used by various other programs to locate the JDK, such as ant, some IDEs, and third-party libraries.

If you're using a specific IDE for your project then you'll need to find out how it locates the JVM. If you'll be compiling on the command line, then adjust your PATH so that the 1.5 install precedes the 1.6 install, or use full paths to the compiler and VM.

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I updated my question –  Em Ae Oct 15 '12 at 15:23

JAVA_HOME is differ from PATH where the java executes from.

Read this you will get clear idea

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/essential/environment/paths.html

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AFAIK, none of the HotSpot Java commands use JAVA_HOME for anything:

Commands such as java and javac are located based on the PATH variable, on Windows, UNIX, Linux, and BSD-based operating systems such as MacOS. Location of commands via the PATH is a typically command shell and/or OS function.

The JAVA_HOME variable is used by some 3rd-party tools such as Ant, Maven, Tomcat and so on to locate the Java installation to be used. But other tools ignore JAVA_HOME and either use an application specific configuration mechanism (e.g. Eclipse), or some shell stuff to determine the installation location from (for example) the location of the java command found via the PATH.

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