Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
-(void)setUserFilters{

    //init the user filters array
    userFilters = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];
    SearchCriteria *tmpSc= [[SearchCriteria alloc] init];
    for(int i=0;i<[searchFilters count];i++)
    {
	tmpSc=[self.searchFilters objectAtIndex:i];
	if(tmpSc.enabled==TRUE)
		[userFilters addObject:tmpSc];
    }
    }

searchFilters is a list of filters that can be setted to true or false and I use userFilters to populate a table view with the filters that are only setted to TRUE

But the line SearchCriteria *tmpSc= [[SearchCriteria alloc] init]; causes leaks, and I don't know how to solve because if I release at the end of the function I loose my pointers and it crashes

Any ideas?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

twolfe18 has made the code >much slower if searchFilters can be large. -objectAtIndex: is not a fast operation on large arrays, so you shouldn't do it more than you have to. (While true that FE is faster than objectAtIndex:, this overstated the issue and so I've striken it; see my other comments on the advantages of Fast Enumeration.)

There are a number of problems in your code:

  • Never create a method that begins "set" but is not an accessor. This can lead to very surprising bugs because of how Objective-C provides Key-Value Compliance. Names matter. A property named userFilters should have a getter called -userFilters and a setter called -setUserFilters:. The setter should take the same type that the getter returns. So this method is better called -updateUserFilters to avoid this issue (and to more correctly indicate what it does).

  • Always use accessors. They will save you all kinds of memory management problems. Your current code will leak the entire array if -setUserFilters is called twice.

  • Both comments are correct that you don't need to allocate a temporary here. In fact, your best solution is to use Fast Enumeration, which is both very fast and very memory efficient (and the easiest to code).

Pulling it all together, here's what you want to be doing (at least one way to do it, there are many other good solutions, but this one is very simple to understand):

@interface MyObject ()
@property (nonatomic, readwrite, retain) NSMutableArray *userFilters;
@property (nonatomic, readwrite, retain) NSMutableArray *searchFilters;
@end

@implementation MyObject
@synthesize userFilters;
@synthesize searchFilters;

- (void)dealloc
{
    [searchFilters release];
    serachFilters = nil;
    [userFilters release];
    userFilters = nil;
    [super dealloc];
}


- (void)updateUserFilters
{
    //init the user filters array
    // The accessor will retain for us and will release the old value if
    // we're called a second time
    self.userFilters = [NSMutableArray array];

    // This is Fast Enumeration
    for (SearchCriteria *sc in self.searchFilters)
    {
        if(sc.enabled)
        {
            [self.userFilters addObject:sc];
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
objectAtIndex works in constant time (its an array!), it does not get significantly slower on big arrays, that is silly. if you want to honestly tell me that you have tested it and objectAtIndex is more than 2% slower than whatever you recommend, then you would be better off spending your time on something else. –  twolfe18 Aug 17 '09 at 19:57
1  
I've measured between 2% and 35% improvements in the loop, depending on the complexity of the work being done in the loop (obviously more improvement the less work in the loop). The fact that it requires less typing is usually selling point enough. You also get exceptions if you accidentally mutate the array during the loop rather than silently wrong behavior (even if the mutation happens on another thread). I concede that you will not often see dramatic improvements in perceived performance. –  Rob Napier Aug 17 '09 at 20:41
2  
NSArray "is an array" in the sense that it provides an interface to an object that supports array-like operations. It is not guaranteed to be implemented like a C array under the covers, and no performance guarantees are made about how fast object access is. –  peterb Aug 17 '09 at 21:20
    
Thank you for all your answers I solved my leaks problems and improved my code –  Mathieu Aug 18 '09 at 0:19

It seems that your initially creating a SearchCriteria object and before you use it or release it your reassigning the variable to another object from self.searchFilters. So you don't need to create the initial object and why it's leaking and not being released.

Try:

SearchCriteria *tmpSc = nil;

Hope that helps.

share|improve this answer
    
= nil, I suspect you mean - null is a Java-ism and NULL is a void* for other pointer types (nil is generally for id*). Though since they compile to the same type, you can end up using either ... –  AlBlue Aug 17 '09 at 22:47
    
Yes your quite right I did mean nil. Thank you. –  John S. Eddie Aug 18 '09 at 10:04

first of all, the worst n00b code you can write involves if(condition==true) do_something(), just write if(condition) do_something().

second, there is no reason to have tempSc at all (never mind alloc memory for it), you can just do the following:

-(void)setUserFilters{

//init the user filters array
userFilters = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];
for(int i=0;i<[searchFilters count];i++)
{
    if([self.searchFilters objectAtIndex:i].enabled)
            [userFilters addObject:[self.searchFilters objectAtIndex:i]];
}
}
share|improve this answer
    
Also, in Objective-C the keywords are YES & NO instead of true & false. Sometimes true will work, but don't rely on it. –  jbrennan Aug 17 '09 at 19:37
    
Correct, Objective-C does use YES and NO, but I believe TRUE, FALSE, true, and false are all #defined to resolve to YES and NO. I have not seen a case where true or false did not work. Good style says you should use YES and NO though. –  twolfe18 Aug 17 '09 at 19:45
2  
YES is defined as a 1 cast to a signed char. true is replaced with the symbol "1" in C (so its type and size are undefined). In C++, true is of bool type. Yes, they will generally resolve similarly in conditionals; they may not be the same size and may not encode the same. Don't mix them. The Objective-C truth value is YES and its type is BOOL. –  Rob Napier Aug 17 '09 at 20:05
    
-1 for rude and flawed answer (still leaking memory) –  T . Aug 18 '09 at 0:08

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.