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I would like to do as follows:

Select * from
table1  a
inner join table2 b

on

a.id = b.id

if (some condition is met) //  Now it gets interesting!

begin

and a.name = b.name

end

Obviously, this doesn't work.

How can this best be accomplished?

Thanks Stackers!

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Can you post some actual code of what you have tried instead of just the pseudocode above. It depends on what your condition calculation is bases on. Maybe additional joins would be best or maybe putting it in the WHERE clause would be best. –  Tobsey Oct 15 '12 at 15:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would use something like this:

SELECT * FROM table1 a
JOIN table2 b ON (a.id = b.id)
WHERE NOT ( == your condition here == ) OR a.name = b.name

If you really want to put it in the join condition, you could do something like this:

SELECT * FROM table1 a
JOIN table2 b ON (a.id = b.id AND (NOT ( == your condition here == ) OR a.name = b.name))

but I think the first form is more clear.

EDIT: as @James Curtis noted in the comments:

it is important to note that the option to put the condition in the WHERE clause is only valid for an INNER JOIN, for an outer join you may eliminate rows.

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could you please elaborate with an example for == your condition here == thanks! –  Pinch Oct 15 '12 at 15:38
    
@Pinch replace that with conditions you want to check before you join on name - 'some condition is met' –  rs. Oct 15 '12 at 15:40
    
@Pinch you should replace my == your condition here == with whatever condition you wanted to check when in your question you wrote if(some condition is met) –  Matteo Tassinari Oct 15 '12 at 15:42
1  
It is important to note that the option to put the condition in the WHERE clause is only valid for an INNER JOIN, for an outer join you may eliminate rows. –  James Curtis Oct 15 '12 at 15:47

Why can't you just put the condition in the WHERE-clause?

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+1 Quick thinking –  Pinch Oct 15 '12 at 15:39

Generally, you would make a conditional join something like this:

Select * 
from table1 a
inner join table2 b
on (a.conditional_field = 1 and a.id = b.id)
or (a.conditional_field = 2 and a.id2 = b.id2)

The important thing to note here is that makes the join condition optional, not the join itself. If you're looking to make the join itself conditional, that's what outer joins are for:

Select * 
from table1 a
left outer join table2 b
on a.id = b.id

The first query will return all matching rows from either condition is true. The second query will unconditionally return all rows from table1 and only those rows from table2 where the condition is true.

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+1 thanks so much –  Pinch Oct 15 '12 at 15:48

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