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int func(int arr[100][150], int rows, int columns);
int func(int arr[100][150], int rows, int columns)
{
   //stuff here
}

This function works. What should I do if I would like to assign arr size to arr[rows][columns], but not 100 and 150 all the time? If I assign it to 100 and 150 it probably uses more memory than it should if rows and colums are smaller?

int func(int arr[rows][columns], int rows, int columns);
int func(int arr[rows][columns], int rows, int columns)
{
   //stuff here
}

or

int func(int arr[][], int rows, int columns);
int func(int arr[][], int rows, int columns)
{
   //stuff here
}

doesn't work.

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Your question seems to be a possible duplicate of this one: stackoverflow.com/questions/4051/… –  jrd1 Oct 15 '12 at 15:55
    
You can find detail regarding sending 2D array to a function here. stackoverflow.com/questions/12652598/… –  Coding Mash Oct 15 '12 at 16:08
    
@jrd: Not a good duplicate, as all of the answers fail to indicate that C supports variable-length arrays in function parameters. –  Eric Postpischil Oct 15 '12 at 16:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Pass the dimensions first:

int func(int rows, int columns, int arr[rows][columns])
{
    …
}

(Actually, the first dimension may be omitted. Dimensions after the first are needed to compute addresses.)

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doesn't work.|| –  good_evening Oct 15 '12 at 16:00
    
@hey This is a gcc extension, not a standard (link). –  dasblinkenlight Oct 15 '12 at 16:01
    
wow, it actually does work. so it allocates only memory needed? –  good_evening Oct 15 '12 at 16:01
    
@dasblinkenlight I thought a forward decl was a gcc extension, but isn't straight-up params part of C99 ? –  WhozCraig Oct 15 '12 at 16:03
    
@dasblinkenlight: This is standard C. It is explicitly shown in C 2011 6.7.5.2 10, “EXAMPLE 4”. –  Eric Postpischil Oct 15 '12 at 16:03

Eric's code works, another way to do it (which I prefer) is to replace the explicit array parameter with a pointer like so:

int func(int* x, int rows, int columns)
{
        //...
}

In this way, the function could be used for both 1D and 2D arrays. This is just an alternative to the answer Eric gave; either one could be used, depending on personal preference and the specific application.

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