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So I'm currently implementing a queue as a singly linked list. Everything is going fine, but the compiler is flagging me at my dequeue method.

This is what Visual Studio barks at me:

error C2065: 'Removed' : undeclared identifier

Here is my dequeue method which is supposed to return the value that was just removed from the queue:

template <typename Type>
Type QueueLinked<Type>::deque() {
if (queueFront == 0) {
    cout << "Queue is empty! There's nothing to remove!" << endl;
} else {
    nodeType<Type> *temp;
    temp = queueFront;
    queueFront = queueFront->next;
    Type Removed = temp->dataItem;
    delete temp;

    if (queueFront == 0) {
        queueRear = 0;
    }
}
return Removed;
} 

Here is my node struct:

template <typename Type>
struct nodeType {
    Type dataItem;
    nodeType<Type> *next;
};

This seems like an extremely simple error to have, but I'm not seeing what is causing this. Hopefully I'm not being too dumb, but it wouldn't be the first time.

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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You declare it in the else block, of course it is undeclared outside of it. Declare it before the if.

Try this way:

template <typename Type>
Type QueueLinked<Type>::deque() {
  Type Removed;
  if (queueFront == 0) {
    cout << "Queue is empty! There's nothing to remove!" << endl;
  } else {
    nodeType<Type> *temp;
    temp = queueFront;
    queueFront = queueFront->next;
    Removed = temp->dataItem;
    delete temp;

    if (queueFront == 0) {
        queueRear = 0;
    }
  }
return Removed;
} 
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You're 100% right. I should have seen that I was returning something only declared in some cases. Rookie mistake, but a lesson learned. –  Derek W Oct 15 '12 at 16:35
1  
You might also ask yourself exactly what you are returning when nothing was removed! –  Bo Persson Oct 15 '12 at 17:03
    
I was immediately suspect of that fact. In my head I was justifying it as just leaving Removed undefined, but it was painfully obvious after Matzi's assistance that if it was never declared then this leads to a whole separate issue. –  Derek W Oct 15 '12 at 18:41
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