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On Bash-Hackers.org there is a nice little wiki entry on collapsing functions. Basically, a collapsing function is a function that redefines itself based on some condition. The basic example was something like the following:

chatter() {
  if [[ $verbose ]]; then
    chatter() {
      echo "$@"
    }
    chatter "$@"
  else
    chatter() {
      :
    }
  fi
}

I thought that was a nice little trick that might be useful for creating functions like the following:

# a portable extended regular expression sed for Linux and Mac
# simply checks if using an option fails for one version
# @see http://wiki.bash-hackers.org/howto/collapsing_functions
my_sed() {
    if ( echo abc | sed -r /abd/p > /dev/null 2>/dev/null ) ; then 
        #we are running a GNU version. redefine function
        echo gnu
        my_sed() {
            sed -r "$@"
        }
    else 
        #we are running another version. defaulting to BSD
        #redefining function
        echo osx
        my_sed() {
            sed -E "$@"
        }
    fi
    my_sed "$@"
}

(The echo statements are just for debugging btw). This works as intended when running it as my_sed "s/foo/bar" /tmp/somefile.txt, outputting "gnu" (on Linux, osx on Mac) the first time, then keeping silent for subsequent runs. But if I simply use the function in pipes, the function is not being redefined, constantly outputting "gnu". Example: echo 123 | my_sed 's/foo/bar' will output "gnu" every time it is being run in the shell.

Why is this? What is piping doing with the current context/shell that keeps the function from keeping its new definition? Is piping forking a new process each time, so that the new definition is lost from the originating shell?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

pipelines are run in a subshell, and the redefinition is lost when the subshell exits.

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as I though then. thanks! –  oligofren Oct 15 '12 at 16:29
1  
If you are using bash 4.2 or later (you'll have to upgrade for sure on Mac OS X, as it ships with 3.2), you can use shopt -s lastpipe before calling my_sed the first time, which will cause the last command in a pipeline to run in the current shell, not a subshell. That might solve the problem. –  chepner Oct 15 '12 at 17:29
    
Good tip, but unfortunately, even OS X 10.6 (released in 2010) uses a Bash version from 2007 (version 3.2.48) ... –  oligofren Oct 16 '12 at 10:56
    
Turns out even OS X 10.8 (released fall 2012) uses the old 3.2 release :-/ –  oligofren Oct 16 '12 at 13:31

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