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Can anybody tell me when to use typedef in C? In the following code I get a warning by gcc :

warning: useless storage class specifier in empty declaration

typedef struct node
{
  int data;
  struct node* forwardLink;
} ;
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4  
Removed c++. C and C++ are different languages. "When to use typedef in C++" is a separate question with a different answer. –  n.m. Oct 15 '12 at 17:00

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

So..

You can do this:

struct node {
  int data;
  struct node* forwardLink;
};

To define an object that you can use as struct node.

Like this:

struct node x;

However, say you wanted to refer to it as just node. Then you could do:

struct node {
  int data;
  struct node* forwardLink;
};

typedef struct node node;

or

 typedef struct {
  int data;
  void* forwardLink;
} node;

and then use that as:

node x;
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Is the latter valid C? I would think you'd have to do typedef struct Node {int data; struct Node * forwardLink;} NODE; or somesuch (some, or even most, C dialects may allow the same spelling for the struct name and typedef name, but most code I've seen would use slightly different names; the C dialects I'm familar with do not allow a name defined only as a typedef to be used as a struct name). –  supercat Oct 18 '12 at 16:41
    
@supercat: If you saw my earlier comments, ignore them. You're completely right. I've swapped the member struct Node * to just a void *, which while wouldn't be particularly useful in the OP's case, it does still explain the generic situation. –  Bill Lynch Oct 18 '12 at 17:32

The syntax of typedef is typedef <type> <name>; it makes the type accessible through the name. In this case, you've only specified a type, and no name, so your compiler complains.

You probably want

typedef struct node
{
  int data;
  struct node* forwardLink;
} node;
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Use typedef when you want to use another name for a type, e.g. a structure.

In your case, instead of using struct node to declare a variable, you might use instead just Node, as an alias for struct node.

But you're missing the alias in your declaration:

typedef struct node
{
  int data;
  struct node* forwardLink;
} Node;

This accomplishes the same thing but might better illuminate the cause of your error:

struct node
{
  int data;
  struct node* forwardLink;
};

// this is equivalent to the above typedef:
typedef struct node Node;
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typedef struct node
{
    int data;
    struct node* forwardLink;
} MyNode;

In case you want to write

MyNode * p;

instead of

struct node *p;

Inside the struct, you still need the struct node * forwardLink;

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Typedef is used to define user data type. For example

typedef int integer;

Now you can use integer to define int datatype instead of int.

integer a;// a would be declared as int only
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For contants which are a list of possible values of some variable:

typedef enum {BLACK=0, WHITE, RED, YELLOW, BLUE} TColor;

In general it helps you know if you are manipulating things correctly, because compilers will warn you about implicit castings, among other things. It is more useful than just making your code more readable.

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