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I have an array which contains dates.

dates = [#<DateTime: 2002-07-01T00:00:00+00:00 ((2452457j,0s,0n),+0s,2299161j)>, #<DateTime: 2003-10-31T00:00:00+00:00 ((2452944j,0s,0n),+0s,2299161j)>, #<DateTime: 2003-12-01T00:00:00+00:00 ((2452975j,0s,0n),+0s,2299161j)>, #<DateTime: 2004-03-01T00:00:00+00:00 ((2453066j,0s,0n),+0s,2299161j)>, #<DateTime: 2004-03-01T00:00:00+00:00 ((2453066j,0s,0n),+0s,2299161j)>]

How can I check the sort order of this array if its ascending or descending?

share|improve this question
    
Why not just compare the first two dates? – AlexDev Oct 15 '12 at 16:54
    
@AlexDev, first two dates might not be enough, especially if they are the same date, you might even have an array where all values are the same, so probably want to test them all – marflar Oct 15 '12 at 17:02
up vote 6 down vote accepted

An array is ascending if the first of each two adjacent elements is less or equal than the second:

def ascending? arr
  arr.each_cons(2).all?{|i,j| i <= j}
end

alternatively, you can compare the array with sorted version of itself:

def ascending? arr
  arr == arr.sort
end
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @Mladen, Here is what i did and its working great. assert_equal(dates,dates.sort!) to verify if its descending and assert_equal(dates,dates.sort) to make sure its ascending. – bkone Oct 15 '12 at 17:08
    
Be careful with sort! as it will modify your original array, not sure if that is what you want. – Mladen Jablanović Oct 15 '12 at 17:10
    
Yes this exactly what I wanted. I'm basically using cucumber & webdriver to write some tests. When I click the Ascending link I want to make sure that the list displayed is in ascending order. So I capture the whole list of dates into an array and compare it with the sorted array for ascending and for descending I compare it with sort! – bkone Oct 15 '12 at 17:17

Here's some benchmark results for processing speed:

require 'benchmark'
require 'date'

ary = (DateTime.parse('2002-07-01T00:00:00+00:00') .. DateTime.parse('2004-03-01T00:00:00+00:00')).to_a

def ascending1? arr
  arr.reduce{ |e1,e2| e1 <= e2 ? e2 : (return false) }; true
end

def ascending2? arr
  arr.each_cons(2).all?{|i,j| i <= j}
end

def ascending3? arr
  arr == arr.sort
end

n = 10_000
Benchmark.bm(9) do |b|
  b.report('reduce')    { n.times{ ascending1?(ary) } }
  b.report('each_cons') { n.times{ ascending2?(ary) } }
  b.report('sort')      { n.times{ ascending3?(ary) } }
end

With the test results:

                user     system      total        real
reduce      1.380000   0.000000   1.380000 (  1.381107)
each_cons   2.250000   0.000000   2.250000 (  2.243958)
sort        0.670000   0.000000   0.670000 (  0.675025)
share|improve this answer

Why not just check if the sorted array is the same as the unsorted array?

array == array.sort for ascending

and array == array.sort.reverse for descending

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I think reduce will be faster than each_cons

def ascending? arr
  arr.reduce{ |e1,e2| e1 <= e2 ? e2 : (return false) }; true
end
share|improve this answer
1  
all? should return immediately as well. – Mladen Jablanović Oct 15 '12 at 17:12
    
@MladenJablanović, yeah, you're right, fixed. – megas Oct 15 '12 at 17:14

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