Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am working inside of a large class that is one of the backbones of an application, we'll call this myClass. I need to create a new public method of this class and have it accept a variable array that calls out to the individual methods of the function I'm writing: my_new_iterative_function()... In a sense, I need to have a "class within a class" (javascript is nice for this ;) ... how can I achieve the following, where I iterate over the $fallback_order parameter array to change the order these methods are called and then have a default order, which is executed if $fallback_order is false as defined in the default paramater?

class myClass {
    public function existing_app_method_1() {
        // other code
    }
    public function existing_app_method_2() {
        // other code
    }
    // large app-centric class with many more methods

    public function my_new_iterative_function( array $fallback_order = false ) {
        method_foo() {
            // do stuff
        }
        method_bar() {
            // do stuff
        }
        method_more_methods() {
            // there are at least 5 of them in total
        }

        if ( $fallbackorder == false ):
            method_foo();
            method_bar();
        else:
            foreach ( $fallback_order as $index => $this_fallback ) {
                $name = $this_fallback;
                if ( $this_fallback == $name ):
                    $this->$name();
                endif;
            }
        endif;
    }
}

The goal would be the following in the view templates:

<div><?php $myClass->my_new_iterative_function( array( 'method_more_methods', 'method_bar', 'method_foo', ) ); ?></div>

EDIT: Fixed some obviously faulty logic

share|improve this question
    
What version of php does it have to work on? Since 5.3 you can have anonymous functions and closures. –  complex857 Oct 15 '12 at 16:58
    
We're assuming the latest version of PHP –  Brian Oct 15 '12 at 16:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could have your methods as anonymous functions in an array inside your method and index those arrays with the input, something like this:

class Foo {
    private $stuff = 'tickle me elmo';        

    public function my_new_iterative_function(array $fallback_order = array('method_foo', 'method_bar')) {

        $self = $this; // this acts as a keyword, you can't use in the `use ()` part

        $order_functions = array(
            'method_foo' => function() use ($self) {
                print "im in foo: {$self->stuff}<br>";
            },
            'method_bar' => function(){
                print "im in bar<br>";
            },
        );

        foreach ( $fallback_order as $index => $this_fallback ) {
            $order_functions[$this_fallback]();
        }
    }
}
(new Foo)->my_new_iterative_function(); // look, one-line `new` and method call, since php 5.4
(new Foo)->my_new_iterative_function([ 'method_bar', 'method_foo', ]); // and even [] for array literals too!

I've also embeded the default order in the default parameter. (setting it to false when you typehint it as an array is a fatal error)

share|improve this answer
    
This is wonderful - thanks so much! –  Brian Oct 15 '12 at 17:12
    
Small problem - I need to use $this and the code here is throwing an error for using $this when not in object context. :/ ... is there a workaround so that this code could still be used? I'm calling out to other methods, the real code is VERY complex. –  Brian Oct 15 '12 at 17:44
    
You can push the $this in with the scope syntax, updated the example. –  complex857 Oct 15 '12 at 20:02

I realise you already have a good answer which you've accepted, and I should caveat this by saying that I don't really know PHP very well, but thought I might chime in regardless as I've given this a little bit of thought.

I wondered if it might be neater to abstract the logic in the methods you iterate over into separate commands (with the obvious advantages that you can add further methods without touching the iteration code and you'll minimise the amount of additional code you add to your large class). You could then set a default order array as a property of myClass but override it, if required, in the parameter of the my_new_iterative_function method (or, probably better, via a setter on myClass).

Excuse the code, but something like this:

class myClass 
{

    // override default order via class setter if required
    protected $fallback_order = array(new FooCommand(), new BarCommand(), new ANOtherCommand());

    public function my_new_iterative_function(  ) {

            foreach ( $this -> fallback_order as $value ) {
                $value -> execute();
            }
    }
}

Or maybe like this:

class MyClass 
{

    // override default order in method invokation if required
    protected $default_fallback_order = array(new FooCommand(), new BarCommand(), new ANOtherCommand());

    public function my_new_iterative_function( $fallback_order = null ) {

            // Use default fallback order if an override has not been 
            // specified in method parameter
            if (is_null($fallback_order))
                $fallback_order = $this -> default_fallback_order;

            foreach ( $fallback_order as $value ) {
                $value -> execute();
            }
    }
}

$myClass = new MyClass();
$myClass -> my_new_iterative_function(); // use default fallback order
$myClass -> my_new_iterative_function(array(new ANOtherCommand(), new BarCommand(), new FooCommand()));
share|improve this answer
    
This is great - as the above answer (as you may have guessed) is causing me some headaches right now. Does this still work if $fallback_order is declared within my_new_iterative_function()? Because my_new_iterative_function() needs to be the point where the ordered array of functions is received for reasons of business logic. myClass Contains a large number of public and private methods. It is a large controller. –  Brian Oct 16 '12 at 0:32
    
I'm sure it would, I'm just not 100% on the syntax or, of course, your business requirements. Could you have a condition on the value of the parameter received in your function to decide whether to use that or the default set in the class property? –  net.uk.sweet Oct 16 '12 at 0:41
    
Okay I had a bash. See updated answer. –  net.uk.sweet Oct 16 '12 at 23:19

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.