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I have only recently started learning recursion and have some trouble concerning a particular exercise; rewriting a function iteratively from a recursive state, particularly if there are several base cases involved:

double function(int j, int i)
{
    if(i == 0 || j == 1)
    {
        return 1;
    }

    if(i == 1 || j == 0)
    {
        return j;
    }

    if(i > 0)
    {
        return j * function(j, --i);
    }

    return 1 / (function(j, -i))
}

I am having trouble rewriting the function iteratively.

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What is the question? –  Jeff Oct 15 '12 at 18:13
2  
Do you want source code, or only the basic idea? –  Rontogiannis Aristofanis Oct 15 '12 at 18:13
1  
what are you trying to do? what trouble are you facing? Add it in your question –  Aniket Oct 15 '12 at 18:13
2  
The call function(4, -1) never ends. –  jplot Oct 15 '12 at 18:13
    
@jplot: I think that last line should be return 1 / (function(j, -i)); –  Mooing Duck Oct 15 '12 at 18:29

2 Answers 2

First, here's your code compressed (I do this for answering, don't do this in real code.)

double function(int j, int i) {
    if(i == 0 || j == 1) return 1;
    if(i == 1 || j == 0) return j;
    if(i > 0) return j * function(j, --i);
    return 1 / (function(j, -i)); //changed this to -i
     //might be a division by zero, you should check for that
}

Since that last block can effectively only happen on the outermost loop, we'll pull that out:

double outer_function(int j, int i) {
    if (i<0)
        return 1 / inner_function(j, -i);
    else
        return inner_function(j, i);
}
double inner_function(int j, int i) {
    if(i == 0 || j == 1) return 1;
    if(i == 1 || j == 0) return j;
    if(i > 0) return j * inner_function(j, --i);
}

The first thing I would do is try to put this into a tail recursive form. This involves rearranging the equations so nothing comes after the recursion. (I am not 100% certain I got this step right)

double inner_function(int j, int i, int times=1) {
    if(i == 0 || j == 1) return times;
    if(i == 1 || j == 0) return times*j;
    return inner_function(j, --i, times*j);
}

Now, since in every code path there is no code after the function call, this is fully tail recursive. Tail recursion is easily changed to iteration!

double inner_function(int j, int i, int times=1) {
    while(true) {
        if(i == 0 || j == 1) return times;
        if(i == 1 || j == 0) return times*j;
        //return inner_function(j, --i, times*j);
        --i;
        times *= j;
        //go again!
    }
}

If I were to optimize from here:

double function(int j, int i) {
    bool invert = false;
    if(i<0) {
         i=-i; 
         invert=true;
    }
    double result=1;
    if(i == 0) result = 0;
    else if(j == 0) result = j;
    else if (j != 1) {
        while(i--)
            result *= j;
    }
    return (invert ? 1/result : result);            
}

Or, if I were to guess your intent:

double function(int j, int i) {
    return std::pow(double(j), double(i));
}
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Accuracy test at ideone.com/DCgV0 –  Mooing Duck Oct 16 '12 at 22:02

You really only have one base case during recursion. j never changes, so it is only a special case at the beginning. i will always be positive and headed toward 0 after the first recursive call. So the only real base case is i == 1.

The beginning of the function can stay the same.

double function(int j, int i)
{
    if(i == 0 || j == 1) { return 1; }
    if(i == 1 || j == 0) { return j; }

Now you just have to deal with the i > 0 and i < 0 cases (i == 0 is already taken care of at the beginning).

The difference in the two cases is that if i is negative, you switch the sign and invert the result.

    int invert = i < 0;
    i = abs(i); // or: if (i < 0) { i = -i; }

Now take a look at the recursive part and figure out what's going on.

return j * function(j, --i);

function() will be called until i is 1 and the result at that time will be j. Each iteration will multiply the returned value by j. This can be written like this:

    double returnValue = j; // (the i == 1 case)

    while (i-- > 1) { // loop while i is greater than 1
        returnValue = j * returnValue; // multiply j by the return value
    }

Now invert if necessary and return the result.

    if (invert) {
        returnValue = 1 / returnValue;
    }
    return returnValue;
}
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