Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have a text file which looks something like this:

jdkjf
kjsdh
jksfs
lksfj
gkfdj
gdfjg
lkjsd
hsfda
gadfl
dfgad

[very many lines, that is]

but would rather like it to look like

jdkjf kjsdh
jksfs lksfj
gkfdj gdfjg
lkjsd hsfda
gadfl dfgad

[and so on]

so I can print the text file on a smaller number of pages.

Of course, this is not a difficult problem, but I'm wondering if there is some excellent tool out there for solving problems like these.

EDIT: I'm not looking for a way to remove every other newline from a text file, but rather a tool which interprets text as "pictures" and then lays these out on the page nicely (by writing the appropriate whitespace symbols).

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

You can use this python code.

tables=input("Enter number of tables ")
matrix=[]
file=open("test.txt")
for line in file:
 matrix.append(line.replace("\n",""))
 if (len(matrix)==int(tables)):
  print (matrix)
  matrix=[]
file.close()
share|improve this answer

(Since you don't name your operating system, I'll simply assume Linux, Mac OS X or some other Unix...)

Your example looks like it can also be described by the expression "joining 2 lines together".

This can be achieved in a shell (with the help of xargs and awk) -- but only for an input file that is structured like your example (the result always puts 2 words on a line, irrespective of how many words each one contains):

 cat file.txt | xargs -n 2 | awk '{ print $1" "$2 }'

This can also be achieved with awk alone (this time it really joins 2 full lines, irrespective of how many words each one contains):

 awk '{printf $0 " "; getline; print $0}' file.txt

Or use sed --

 sed 'N;s#\n# #' < file.txt 

Also, xargs could do it:

 xargs -L 2 < file.txt

I'm sure other people could come up with dozens of other, quite different methods and commandline combinations...


Caveats: You'll have to test for files with an odd number of lines explicitly. The last input line may not be processed correctly in case of odd number of lines.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.