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I have a main file which uses(from the main I do a source) a properties file with variables pointing to paths.

The properties file looks like this:

TMP_PATH=/$COMPANY/someProject/tmp
OUTPUT_PATH=/$COMPANY/someProject/output
SOME_PATH=/$COMPANY/someProject/some path

The problem is SOME_PATH, I must use a path with spaces (I can't change it).

I tried escaping the whitespace, with quotes, but no solution so far.

I edited the paths, the problem with single quotes is I'm using another variable $COMPANY in the path

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5 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can escape the "space" char by putting a \ right before it.

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I did that, and did't work –  Federico Oct 15 '12 at 19:09
    
Did you wrap that path in any quotations by any chance? –  Florin Stingaciu Oct 15 '12 at 19:13
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Resolved. The problem was in one reference was the variable without the quotes –  Federico Oct 15 '12 at 19:34
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I see Federico you've found solution by yourself. The problem was in two places. Assignations need proper quoting, in your case

SOME_PATH="/$COMPANY/someProject/some path"

is one of possible solutions.

But in shell those quotes are not stored in a memory, so when you want to use this variable, you need to quote it again, for example:

NEW_VAR="$SOME_PATH"

because if not, space will be expanded to command level, like this:

NEW_VAR=/YourCompany/someProject/some path

which is not what you want.

For more info you can check out my article about it http://www.cofoh.com/white-shell

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This should really be marked as the correct answer. The detail of quoting the variables themselves seems to be the main thing that trips people up (me included!) –  pospi Feb 5 at 3:35
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SOME_PATH=/mnt/someProject/some\ path

should work

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Yea I tried escaping the character, but in that case gives me "/mnt/someProject/some" without the " path" –  Federico Oct 15 '12 at 19:08
    
It might have to do something with your OS then. A standard bash console should work. What OS are you using? –  meza Oct 15 '12 at 19:12
    
I'm using ubuntu –  Federico Oct 15 '12 at 19:20
    
Me too, and it works for me. How are you trying to use it? –  meza Oct 15 '12 at 19:25
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Use one of these threee variants:

SOME_PATH="/mnt/someProject/some path"
SOME_PATH='/mnt/someProject/some path'
SOME_PATH=/mnt/someProject/some\ path
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If the file contains only parameter assignments, you can use the following loop in place of sourcing it:

# Instead of source file.txt
while IFS="=" read name value; do
    declare "$name=$value"
done < file.txt

This saves you having to quote anything in the file, and is also more secure, as you don't risk executing arbitrary code from file.txt.

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This could have been a solution. The problem is there are more things than assignations. Thanks! –  Federico Oct 15 '12 at 19:39
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