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Data Mapper is a layer of Mappers that moves data between objects and a database while keeping them independent of each other and the mapper itself.

Repository mediates between the domain and data mapping layers using a collection-like interface for accessing domain objects.

Thus main job of Data Mappers is performing the mapping between objects and table rows and keeping the domain and database independent of each other, while main job or a Repository is to provide a more of an object-oriented view of the persistence layer and also keeping domain layer completely independent of the persistence layer.

a) As far as I can tell, both Data Mapper and Repository abstract the persistence layer,only difference being that Repository provides more of an object oriented view of the persistence layer?

b) In most implementations Repository sits on top of a Data Mapper layer, but in the following implementation ( From the book Architecting Net Solutions for the Enterprise ) the same interface functions as both a Data Mapper and a Repository ( thus it also masks the persistence layer as a collection ):

public interface IDataMapper<T>
{
/* Persistence */
void Create(T item);
void Update(T item);
void Delete(T item);

/* Repository */
IList<T> GetAll();
IList<T> GetAll(int index, int size);
int GetCount();
int GetCount(Query query);
T GetByKey(object key);
IList<T> GetByCriteria(Query query);
IList<T> GetByCriteria(Query query, int index, int size);
string TranslateQuery(Query query);
}

What are the advantages/disadvantages of such design compared to a design where Repository sits on top of data mapper layer?

thank you

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I agree with @jgauffin when he says that the interfaces should be segregated. However, if you are sure that you are not exporting the interface to outside modules/apps (although interfaces are more likely to be used by others... that is why they are interfaces), you are also sure that no-one else is going to implement it, it is your own code only and even your code is not going to want to have mapper separated from repository, you can trade off and have them combined. It may lead to a more compact code... and probably tighter or enforced coupling. If these can be advantageous in certain situations, probably that is why the author of an Architecture book did it that way.

However, again, I believe, the best way is to separate the interfaces as suggested by @jgauffin. You cannot be sure about clients of the interfaces and the extensions that may be required in future. Separating the interfaces would yield more maintainable and extensible code.

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I will rephrase my original question: What are the advantages/disadvantages of having same class implement both Data Mapper and Repository interfaces compared to Repository sitting on top of Data Mapper layer? –  user702769 Oct 16 '12 at 10:32
1  
@user702769 Advantages of composite approach: 1. compact code 2.Tighter coupling/restrictive way to change code (If you are going to change this, then it is mandatory that you change that as architect considers the two things as a single unit) 3. A well understood trade off.... Advantages of separation approach: 1. Maintainable 2. Loosely coupled tasks. 3. Extensible 4. Not so brittle as composite code. –  Atul Oct 16 '12 at 11:53
    
"Advantages of composite approach: ... 2.Tighter coupling/restrictive way to change code" Why do you consider tighter coupling as an advantage? –  user702769 Oct 16 '12 at 13:02
1  
These things should be considered in some context. As I said, an advantage of separated approach is loose coupling. But, when we say two things are tightly coupled, the two tend to appear as a single unit to outside world. If they(~clients) can't change with respect to each other, it is a problem for the two 'only if they want to' vary w.r.t. each other. If the designer decides that the two shouldn't appear as two separate units & instead only appear- to the outside world- as a single unit, then it's better if they are very close to each other. The boundaries of functionalities tend to blur. –  Atul Oct 16 '12 at 15:06
    
much thanx to both of you –  user702769 Oct 16 '12 at 18:44

That code is violating Interface Segregation Principle which basically says that you should create smaller well defined interfaces instead of a larger one with many features.

This motivator explains it well:

enter image description here

Instead of a simple USB interface you get a top of the notch box with lot's of advanced stuff (which is very hard to implement).

The reason to why you should keep interfaces small is that an interface forces each implementor to implement all methods (unless they want to violate Liskovs Substitution Principle).

Hence break it up and instead let the class implement both of the interfaces.

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1 - "The reason to why you should keep interfaces small is that an interface forces each implementor to implement all methods (unless they want to violate Liskovs Substitution Principle)." By »unless they want to violate LSP" I assume you mean that implementers would simply fill those methods they don't intend to use with stubs? 2 - "Hence break it up and instead let the class implement both of the interfaces." May I then rephrase my original question a bit :D : What are the advantages/disadvantages of having same class implement both Data Mapper and Repository interfaces? –  user702769 Oct 16 '12 at 10:30

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