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Applying @tailrec I'm getting error from scala compiler: "could not optimize @tailrec annotated method get: it contains a recursive call targetting a supertype case _ => tail.get(n-1)". Could someone explain why is that?

trait List[T] {
  def isEmpty: Boolean
  def head: T
  def tail: List[T]
  def get(n: Int): T
}

class Cons[T](val head: T, val tail: List[T]) extends List[T]{
  def isEmpty = false
  @tailrec
  final def get(n: Int) =
    n match {
      case 0 => head
      case _ => tail.get(n-1)
    }
}

class Nil[T] extends List[T]{
  def isEmpty = true
  def head = throw new NoSuchElementException("Nil.head")
  def tail = throw new NoSuchElementException("Nil.tail")
  final def get(n: Int): T = throw new IndexOutOfBoundsException
}

object Main extends App{
  println(new Cons(4, new Cons(7, new Cons(13, new Nil))).get(3))
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Try to imagine what's happening here and what you're asking the compiler to do. Tail call optimization, roughly, turns the method call into a loop, taking the arguments of the method and turning them into variables that are reassigned at each iteration of the loop.

Here, there are two such “loop variables”: n and the list cell itself on which the get method is called, which is actually this in the method body. The next value for n is fine: it's n - 1 and also an Int. The next value for the list cell, which is tail, is a problem, however: this has type Cons[T], but tail only has type List[T].

Thus, there is no way the compiler can turn it into a loop, as there is no guarantee that tail is a Cons[T] — and sure enough, at the end of the list, it is a Nil.

One way to “fix” it would be:

case class Cons[T](val head: T, val tail: List[T]) extends List[T] {
  def isEmpty = false
  @tailrec
  final def get(n: Int) =
    n match {
      case 0 => head
      case _ => tail match {
        case c @ Cons(_, _) => c.get(n - 1)
        case nil @ Nil() => nil.get(n - 1)
      }
    }
}

(Works if both Cons and Nil are case classes — but you'll probably want to make Nil a case object and List[T] covariant in T.)

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Thank you, I got it! Could you please explain you note regarding "List[T] covariant in T"? –  damluar Oct 15 '12 at 20:46
    

In Cons.get you call tail.get as your tail call. But tail is of type List[T], not Cons[T]. So that call won't necessarily be handled by Cons.get, and Scala can't apply the tail recursion optimisation; the optimisation would turn the method call into a local jump back to the start of Cons.get, but that's not necessarily where the call is going.

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Ben and Jean-Phillipe Pellet have already explained why the compiler complains. As for how to fix it, there is a straightforward solution: move the implementation of get right into List:

trait List[T] {
  def isEmpty: Boolean
  def head: T
  def tail: List[T]
  @tailrec
  final def get(n: Int): T = {
    n match {
      case 0 => head
      case _ => tail.get(n-1)
    }
  }
}

class Cons[T](val head: T, val tail: List[T]) extends List[T]{
  def isEmpty = false
}

class Nil[T] extends List[T]{
  def isEmpty = true
  def head = throw new NoSuchElementException("Nil.head")
  def tail = throw new NoSuchElementException("Nil.tail")
}
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1  
+1 Algebraic Data Types are often much more naturally manipulated with a single function that uses pattern matching, than by spreading the implementation over multiple fragments in each class. As soon as you get forced into something like Jean-Philippe's version where the implementation of get in Cons is required to know what other subclasses of List exist, you're often better off moving the whole thing to one place (the base class of the ADT is a natural one). –  Ben Oct 15 '12 at 22:16
    
I also considered that. But when we come down to Nil, exception "NoSuchElementException: Nil.head" is thrown, and I want it to be IndexOutOfBoundsException, which requires overriding, which in turn will break @tailrec –  damluar Oct 16 '12 at 7:20

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