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This code will work and run fine with g++. I do not no why. It should give an error.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
int main(){
    int x=9;
    int y=6;
    //note that there is extra backslash in the end of if statement
    if(x==y)\
    {
        cout<<"x=y"<<endl;
    }
    //note that there is extra backslash in the end of if statement
    if(x!=y)\
    {
        cout<<"x!=y"<<endl;
    }
    return 0;
}
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2  
Why do you feel that it should fail to compile? –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 15 '12 at 20:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 19 down vote accepted

From the C++ Standard:

(C++11, 2.2p1) "Each instance of a backslash character (\) immediately followed by a new-line character is deleted, splicing physical source lines to form logical source lines. Only the last backslash on any physical source line shall be eligible for being part of such a splice."

C says exactly the same:

(C11, 5.1.1.2 Translatation phases p1) "Each instance of a backslash character (\) immediately followed by a new-line character is deleted, splicing physical source lines to form logical source lines."

So:

if(x==y)\
{
    cout<<"x=y"<<endl;
}

is actually equivalent to:

if(x==y){
    cout<<"x=y"<<endl;
}
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I did the following –  user1061392 Oct 15 '12 at 20:39
    
I did the following: if(x==y)\ //this is some words { cout<<"x=y"<<endl; } I should be equivalent to this if(x==y)\ //this is some words{ cout<<"x=y"<<endl; } It is still work –  user1061392 Oct 15 '12 at 20:40
    
@user1061392 What compiler are you using? g++ doesn't compile the code if you put a comment after the backslash. –  Praetorian Oct 15 '12 at 20:49
1  
It should not compile as comments are treated in translation phase 3 and the final backslash character is treated before, in translation phase 2. –  ouah Oct 15 '12 at 20:54

\ escapes the newline. g++ will read if(x==y){ on one line, which is not a syntax error.

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