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I have a table named Student as followed:

CREATE TABLE  "STUDENT" 
(   "ID" NUMBER(*,0), 
    "NAME" VARCHAR2(20), 
    "AGE" NUMBER(*,0), 
    "CITY" VARCHAR2(20), 
    PRIMARY KEY ("ID") ENABLE
)

I am trying to get all the records of the students having a larger age than the average age. This is what I tried:

SELECT *
FROM student
WHERE age > AVG(age)

and

SELECT * 
FROM student
HAVING age > AVG(age)

Both ways did not work!

share|improve this question
up vote 7 down vote accepted

If you going to use an aggregation without a group by you can't reference other fields. (You are with *)

However you can make a subquery that does.

SELECT *
FROM student
WHERE age > (SELECT AVG(age) FROM STUDENT)

This is easy to write and understand. However if you use analytic functions you can get better performance as Justin Cave explains in his answer

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, it worked – Viet Anh Oct 15 '12 at 20:35

The subquery approach that Conrad Fix suggested is the conventional approach. It is unlikely to be the most efficient approach, however, since it requires Oracle to hit the table twice-- once to calculate the average age and once to pull back the rows that have an above-average salary. If you use analytic functions, you can accomplish the same thing while only hitting the table once and doing (roughly) half as many logical I/O operations.

select *
  from (select s.*, avg(age) over () avg_age
          from student s)
 where age > avg_age

The conventional approach requires 18 consistent gets and has to do two full scans of the table (note that I ran both tests a few times to get the lowest value to exclude things like delayed block cleanout)

SQL> ed
Wrote file afiedt.buf

  1  select *
  2    from hr.employees
  3   where salary > (select avg(salary)
  4*                    from hr.employees)
SQL> /

51 rows selected.


Execution Plan
----------------------------------------------------------
Plan hash value: 1945967906

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation           | Name      | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time     |
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT    |           |     5 |   345 |     6   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|*  1 |  TABLE ACCESS FULL  | EMPLOYEES |     5 |   345 |     3   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|   2 |   SORT AGGREGATE    |           |     1 |     4 |            |          |
|   3 |    TABLE ACCESS FULL| EMPLOYEES |   107 |   428 |     3   (0)| 00:00:01 |
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------

   1 - filter("SALARY"> (SELECT AVG("SALARY") FROM "HR"."EMPLOYEES"
              "EMPLOYEES"))


Statistics
----------------------------------------------------------
          0  recursive calls
          0  db block gets
         18  consistent gets
          0  physical reads
          0  redo size
       5532  bytes sent via SQL*Net to client
        557  bytes received via SQL*Net from client
          5  SQL*Net roundtrips to/from client
          0  sorts (memory)
          0  sorts (disk)
         51  rows processed

The analytic function approach, however, does the same thing in one table scan with only 7 consistent gets

SQL> select *
  2    from (select e.*, avg(salary) over () avg_salary
  3            from hr.employees e)
  4   where salary > avg_salary
  5  /

51 rows selected.


Execution Plan
----------------------------------------------------------
Plan hash value: 48081388

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation           | Name      | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time     |
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT    |           |   107 | 15622 |     3   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|*  1 |  VIEW               |           |   107 | 15622 |     3   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|   2 |   WINDOW BUFFER     |           |   107 |  7383 |     3   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|   3 |    TABLE ACCESS FULL| EMPLOYEES |   107 |  7383 |     3   (0)| 00:00:01 |
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------

   1 - filter("SALARY">"AVG_SALARY")


Statistics
----------------------------------------------------------
          1  recursive calls
          0  db block gets
          7  consistent gets
          0  physical reads
          0  redo size
       5220  bytes sent via SQL*Net to client
        557  bytes received via SQL*Net from client
          5  SQL*Net roundtrips to/from client
          1  sorts (memory)
          0  sorts (disk)
         51  rows processed

As Conrad points out, though, the analytic function approach requires a sort so it should use a bit more PGA than the conventional approach. You'll be trading off decreased I/O for increased RAM. Normally that's a desirable trade-off but it is something you should be aware of.

share|improve this answer
2  
+1 Very nice alternative although its worth noting, as your data shows, you're trading CPU/IO for RAM. – Conrad Frix Oct 15 '12 at 21:29
    
I'm enlightened a bit. Thank you! – Viet Anh Oct 23 '12 at 13:14

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