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  • My goal

Make an app with one window. The root view of the window will be a couple of images with 4 buttons. Each of these 4 buttons will display a different (main) view. Each main view will display other (sub)views and each main and sub views should be capable of "going back" to the root view.

  • What I have done (it is based on Apple's ViewController project)

    • I created 1 NSWindowController and 4 NSViewController with their respected XIB files.

    • The AppDelegate alloc/init an NSWindowController object with the nib containing the window and the root view, then calls showWindow method on it.

    • My subclass of NSWindowController has two ivars: one NSView representing the root view bound in IB, and one NSViewController representing the current view controller.
    • I bound the 4 buttons to the method which changes the view depending on the button tag.

Here is how Apple's ViewController project implements it http://pastie.org/private/zmqpzgnudgovagwigal8dq

Nonetheless, this doesn't work for me, it just add the view on top of the root view.

As you see, I'm a bit lost, feel free to share your ideas!

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted

One approach is to use NSBox. The full code for this demo is on github. See the link at the bottom.

Getting Started

Start a new project in Xcode using the Cocoa Application template. Use the prefix appropriate to you. I'll use SOD for StackOverflowDemo.

Before doing anything else, make a couple of small changes to the files that were added to your project automatically as part of the template:

  • MainMenu.xib: delete the NSWindow.
  • SODAppDelegate.h: delete the line: @property (assign) IBOutlet NSWindow *window;

To simplify your example, let's say you want to have a single window with a column of clickable items (for simplicity, let's say buttons) on the left hand side.

SODWindowController

Start by adding an NSWindowController subclass to your project. Be sure to include a corresponding XIB. Open SODWindowController.xib, add four buttons (I used square buttons) to the left hand side of the window and add an NSBox, filling the rest of the window. At this point, you'll have something a bit like this.

Step 1

I set the contentView of the box to be a layer-hosting view whose layer had a background color of [NSColor greenColor]. I did this because, otherwise, you wouldn't be able to see the box at all. The box has been configured so that it will be used only for swapping views in and out of. To configure your box like this, in Interface Builder, select the NSBox and, in the Attributes Inspector, set the Title Position to be None and set the Border Type to be None.

Now in SODWindowController.m, replace the stub for initWithWindow:

- (id)initWithWindow:(NSWindow *)window
{
    self = [super initWithWindow:window];
    if (self) {
        // Initialization code here.
    }

    return self;
}

with a different designated initializer:

- (id)init
{
    self = [super initWithWindowNibName:@"SODWindowController"];
    {

    }
    return self;
}

This will allow you to avoid having to retype (and potentially mistype XIB's name.

Additionally, add a class extension for SODWindowController just after the line

#import "SODWindowController.h"

in SODWindowController.m, giving yourself an IBOutlet to the NSBox:

@interface SODWindowController ()
@property (nonatomic, strong, readwrite) IBOutlet NSBox *box;
@end

In Interface Builder, open SODWindowController.xib and set the box outlet to point to the NSBox you added.

Add SODWindowController to SODAppDelegate

Now, add a SODWindowController to SODAppDelegate: add the lines to SODAppDelegate.m just below #import "SODAppDelegate.h":

#import "SODWindowController.h"

@interface SODAppDelegate ()
@property (nonatomic, strong, readwrite) SODWindowController *windowController;
@end

Now we can set our window up to be created on -[NSApplication applicationDidFinishLaunching:]:

- (void)applicationDidFinishLaunching:(NSNotification *)aNotification
{
    self.windowController = [[SODWindowController alloc] init];
    //notice that we don't have to do anything awkward like use initWithWindowNibName:
    [self.windowController showWindow:nil];
}

At this point, when we run the app, we will see our window.

Great, but what about the different views for the four different buttons and the history so that the user can go back?

SODViewControllers

For each of the four views, create an NSViewController subclass. I'll call mine SODCoffeeViewController, SODTeaViewController, SODJavaViewController and SODMeViewController.

In each of them, replace the automatically generated designated initializer stub

- (id)initWithNibName:(NSString *)nibNameOrNil bundle:(NSBundle *)nibBundleOrNil
{
    self = [super initWithNibName:nibNameOrNil bundle:nibBundleOrNil];
    if (self) {
        // Initialization code here.
    }

    return self;
}

with

- (id)init
{
    self = [super initWithNibName:@"SODCoffeeViewController" bundle:nil];
    if (self) {
    }
    return self;
}

although of course substituting in the appropriate NibName argument for each. As before, this will prevent you from having to type `@"MyNibName" anywhere outside of the file which is associated with that Nib.

Add SODViewControllers to SODWindowController

Now, import all four of your view controllers into SODWindowController: add the lines

#import "SODCoffeeViewController.m"
#import "SODTeaViewController.m"
#import "SODJavaViewController.m"
#import "SODTeaViewController.m"

Our SODWindowController needs one of each of these objects. The easiest thing to do add an NSArray property to our SODWindowController class extension

@property (nonatomic, strong, readwrite) NSArray *viewControllers;

and in the implementation of -[SODWindowController init] add the lines

- (id)init
{
    self = [super initWithWindowNibName:@"SODWindowController"];
    if (self) {
        NSMutableArray *mutableViewControllers = [NSMutableArray array];
        [mutableViewControllers addObject:[[SODCoffeeViewController alloc] init]];
        [mutableViewControllers addObject:[[SODTeaViewController alloc] init]];
        [mutableViewControllers addObject:[[SODJavaViewController alloc] init]];
        [mutableViewControllers addObject:[[SODMeViewController alloc] init]];
        self.viewControllers = [mutableViewControllers copy];
    }
    return self;    
}

Now we have one view controller for each of the four views that we want to present, and they are ordered in an array just as they are the four buttons are on the window. More importantly, they are ordered in the same way as the tags on our four buttons. ...after we set their tags, that is.

Open SODWindowController.xib in Interface Builder and set the tag of the top button to 0, the second from the top to 1 and so forth.

Back in SODWindowController.m, add an IBAction to the SODWindowController class extension:

- (IBAction)showPane:(id)sender;

Define this method in the SODWindowController @implemention as follows:

- (void)showPane:(NSButton *)sender
{
    [self showPaneAtIndex:sender.tag];
}

And that's it!

...except of course for defining -[SODWindowController showPaneAtIndex:]. But before doing that, set the action of the four buttons in SODWindowController.xib to be showPane: on File's Owner.

With that done, define showPaneAtIndex: as follows:

- (void)showPaneAtIndex:(NSInteger)index
{
    NSViewController *viewController = (NSViewController *)self.viewController[(NSUInteger)index];
    [self.box setContentView:viewController.view];
}

Now, whenever any of the buttons is pressed, the view of the corresponding view controller will be set as the content view of the box.

Probably, we want the top-most view controller's view (the SODCoffeeViewController's) to be shown as soon as the window appears. To make this happen, just replace the present definition of -windowDidLoad with

- (void)windowDidLoad
{
    [super windowDidLoad];
    [self showPaneAtIndex:0];
}

History

The history is actually the easiest part. What we will do is keep track of an array or two of panes that are behind us (in the sense of the back button in a browser) and those that are before us (in the sense of the forward button). To do this, we will add two mutable array properties to our SODWindowController class extension:

@property (nonatomic, strong, readwrite) NSMutableArray *panesBehind;
@property (nonatomic, strong, readwrite) NSMutableArray *panesBefore;

and initialize them in -init:

    ...
    self.viewControllers = [mutableViewControllers copy];

    self.panesBehind = [NSMutableArray array];
    self.panesBefore = [NSMutableArray array];
    }
    return self;
}

Now, we will need to push the index of each new pane that we visit onto self.panesBehind, so add the line

[self.panesBehind addObject:[NSNumber numberWithInteger:index]];

to your definition of -showPaneAtIndex:.

This allows us to define -goBack, -goForward and the helpers -canGoBack and -canGoForward as follows:

- (BOOL)canGoBack
{
    return self.panesBehind.count > 0;
}

- (void)goBack
{
    if (self.canGoBack) {
        NSNumber *presentPane = self.panesBehind.lastObject;
        [self.panesBehind removeLastObject];
        [self.panesBefore insertObject:presentPane atIndex:0];
        NSNumber *previousPane = self.panesBehind.lastObject;
        [self.panesBehind removeLastObject];
        [self showPaneAtIndex:previousPane.integerValue];
    }
}

- (BOOL)canGoForward
{
    return self.panesBefore.count > 0;
}

- (void)goForward
{
    if (self.canGoForward) {
        NSNumber *nextPane = [self.panesBefore objectAtIndex:0];
        [self.panesBefore removeObjectAtIndex:0];
        [self showPaneAtIndex:nextPane.integerValue];
    }
}

There is a small problem with this, though. If we go forward from pane A to B to C to D then self.panesBehind looks like

A-->B-->C-->D

and self.panesBefore is empty. But if we go back two panes, self.panesBehind looks like

A-->B

and self.panesBefore looks like

C-->D

If at this point we now go to pane E, self.panesBehind will look like

A-->B-->E

as we expect, but self.panesBefore will still look like

C-->D

which is not what we want. For this reason, we add the line

[self.panesBefore removeAllObjects];

to the end of -showPane:.

To try these methods out, go ahead and declare them publicly in the @interface of SODWindowController in SODWindowController.h:

@interface SODWindowController : NSWindowController
- (void)goForward;
- (void)goBack;
@end

Then in MainMenu.xib add two menu items to the File menu for Forward and Back. In SODAppDelegate.h declare two IBActions:

- (IBAction)forward:(id)sender;
- (IBAction)back:(id)sender;

And back in MainMenu.xib, set the action of the Forward menu item to be forward: on the First Responder and the action of the Back menu item to be back: on the First Responder. Finally, define the two methods -[SODAppDelegate forward:] and -[SODAppDelegate back:] to call through to the corresponding methods on SODWindowController:

- (IBAction)forward:(id)sender
{
    [self.windowController goForward];
}

- (IBAction)back:(id)sender
{
    [self.windowController goBack];
}

To download the full source, visit https://github.com/natechan/ViewSwappingDemo.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for all the time you took to write this post, I'm gonna try that as soon as I can. I hope we could discuss about on GH, I have a more complex example: the 4 buttons are inside the NSBox, and clicking on one button hides them all, and show the correspondant view with a "Back" button inside which can hide the current view and show the root view (the 4 buttons). I may have some ideas. Thanks again ! –  b1onic Oct 16 '12 at 7:10
    
It sounds like in your case, you'll, as you said, want to have a box in your SODWindowController which fills the window. You'll want to add a class SODRootViewController, and, on -[SODWindowController windowDidLoad], you'll set the box's contentView to be an instance of SODRootViewController. I recommend using a mechanism like - (void)setViewControllerWithIdentifier:(NSString *)identifier and having an NSDictionary mapping identifier strings (keys) to view controllers (objects). Then change panesBehind and panesBefore to be arrays of NSStrings. –  Nate Chandler Oct 16 '12 at 13:57
    
You mentioned that you want to have another level of depth beyond the root and the four first level view controllers: let's talk about SODCoffeeViewController and let's say that along with the back button you'll have four other buttons to load four different views. Again, you'll want to use an NSBox and do view swapping. As far as history, it would be easiest to store the history of swapping between those four views (SODCoffeeSubAViewController, SODCoffeeSubBViewController, ...) in SODCoffeeViewController using the same mechanism as in SODWindowController. –  Nate Chandler Oct 16 '12 at 14:03

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