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I'm really getting the hang of recursion (or so I think), but this problem is tripping me up. I'm trying to return 1 + 1/2 + 1/3 + ... + 1/n, but no matter what I try the method returns 1.0. I cannot for the life of me figure out what's wrong.

public static double harmonic(int n) {
    if(n == 1) {
        return 1;
    } else {
        return (1 / n) + (1 / harmonic(n - 1));
    }
}
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Have you checked this with a debugger step by step? –  Zavior Oct 15 '12 at 21:28
4  
Use doubles in your division calculations, i.e. (1.0 / n). –  Vulcan Oct 15 '12 at 21:29
    
Yes, I did. It's difficult for me to follow recursion problems through a debugger, however, as there are so many levels that it's tough to follow what's going on. –  Vaindil Oct 15 '12 at 21:29
    
You may also want to protect against the infinite recursion you'll get if a zero or negative number is mistakenly passed for n. –  RBarryYoung Oct 15 '12 at 21:35
    
Yeah, I would normally make the base case if(n <= 1) {, but this is for an online submission system and for some reason it's only accepting what I currently have. –  Vaindil Oct 15 '12 at 21:37

6 Answers 6

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Well, for one, you don't want to return (1 / n) + (1 / harmonic(n - 1)), but also you need to use double arithmetic:

public static double harmonic(int n) {
    if(n == 1) {
        return 1.0;
    } else {
        return (1.0 / n) + harmonic(n - 1);
    }
}

If you left it as 1 / harmonic you'd return another function entirely:

(1 / n) + 1 / ( 1 / (n - 1) + 1 / ( 1 / (n - 2) + 1 / (...) ) )

That is a very confusing function to figure out, btw, but I think (with my 3rd time editing it) I got it right this time.

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That's it! Others suggested using doubles, which was definitely part of the problem, but you also got the correction in the return statement. Thank you! –  Vaindil Oct 15 '12 at 21:34
    
Glad I could help :) Recursion is always tricky business. –  Brian Oct 15 '12 at 21:36

You want to use floating point division:

public static double harmonic(int n) {
    if(n == 1.0) {
        return 1.0;
    } else {
        return (1.0 / n) + (1.0 / harmonic(n - 1.0));
    }
}

That is: 1/2 is 0; 1/2.0 is 0.5.

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Ah, that's part of the problem, but I also implemented my formula incorrectly (it should be return (1.0 / n) + harmonic(n - 1);. Thank you! –  Vaindil Oct 15 '12 at 21:33
    
glad i could help! I only sought to point out why you were getting '0', not anything beyond that point. Brian went the extra mile –  Claudiu Oct 16 '12 at 4:05

You need to use doubles. Right now, you're doing 1 / n, both of which are integers. Change it to:

return (1.0 / n) + (1.0 / harmonic(n - 1));
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Thats because integer division gives integer result.

So, 1/2 == 0

You can use rather use floating-point division like this: -

if(n == 1.0) {
    return 1.0;
} else {
    return (1.0 / n) + harmonic(n - 1); // Should be `harmonic(n - 1)`
}
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Use doubles in your division calculations. Currently, everything is cast to ints, losing any floating-point precision you would normally expect.

public static double harmonic(int n) {
    if (n == 1) {
        return 1;
    } else {
        return (1.0 / n) + (1.0 / harmonic(n - 1));
    }
}
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the recursion part should not include 1/harmonic(n-1) it should be

   public static double harmonic(int n)
  {
    double harm = 0.0;
    if (n == 1) {
        return 1.0;
    }
    else {
        harm = harm + (1.0 / n) +  harmonic(n - 1);
    }
    return harm;

}
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