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I have a class:

class X {
  vector<shared_ptr<T>> v_;

 public:
  vector<shared_ptr<const T>> getTs() { return v_; }
};

It has a vector of shared_ptr of type T. For some reason, it needs to expose a method to return this vector. However, I don't want the content of the vector to be modified, neither are the objects being pointed to. So I need to return a vector of shared_ptr<const T>.

My question is, is there any efficient way to achieve this? If I simply return it, it works, but it needs to reconstruct a vector, which is kind of expensive.

Thanks.

share|improve this question
6  
Is it actually too expensive? Have you measured? – Kerrek SB Oct 15 '12 at 21:32
    
It should be, compared to const vector<shared_ptr<T>>& getTs() { return v_; }. I want to achieve the speed of this form, as well as safety of the other form. – icando Oct 15 '12 at 21:37
    
Have you measured? – Kerrek SB Oct 15 '12 at 21:38
    
Wouldn't a non-copying conversion be, at its core, non-const-safe? Imagine that the class's client called getTs().push_back(shared_ptr_to_truly_const_object); then your class could modify truly_const_object via v_. (This is the same reason that there's no implicit conversion from T** to const T**.) – ruakh Oct 15 '12 at 21:41
1  
@icando : That in no way means it's actually a bottleneck in your code. ;-] – ildjarn Oct 15 '12 at 21:52
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can not do that directly - but you can define "views" on your container that let you do something very similar, if you want to make sure that your pointees are const:

boost::any_range<
  std::shared_ptr<const int>,
  boost::random_access_traversal_tag,
  std::shared_ptr<const int>,
  std::ptrdiff_t
> foo(std::vector<std::shared_ptr<int>>& v)
{
  return v;
}

A simple transform iterator adapter / transformed range might do the trick as well, I just used this to illustrate the point.

share|improve this answer
    
Both KitsuneYMG's answer and this one fit my need. – icando Oct 15 '12 at 23:49
1  
@icando : Note that if you use this approach, since your underlying container is a std::vector<>, you can use boost::random_access_traversal_tag to allow random-access traversal over your view instead of limiting it to forward-only traversal. – ildjarn Oct 16 '12 at 0:28
    
Good point, I'll update that in the answer! – ltjax Oct 16 '12 at 9:24
    
Yet another part of boost I need to go investigate. I really wish our hands weren't tied to C89 for on-the-job development. Curse you Mathworks! – KitsuneYMG Oct 16 '12 at 17:44

Why not return it as a set of iterators?

class X {
  vector<shared_ptr<T>> v_;
  class const_iterator : std::iterator< std::bidirectional_iterator_tag, T >
  {
    vector<shared_ptr<T>>::iterator it;
    const_iterator( vector<shared_ptr<T>>::iterator& v ) :it (v) { }
    const T& operator*() { return const_cast<const T>( **it ); }
    //forward all methods
  }

   public:
  const_iterator ts_begin() { return const_iterator(v_.begin()); }
  const_iterator ts_end() { return const_iterator(v_.end()); }
};

or something similar? That gives you full control over the type and how it's accessed. Plus you can later change the type w/o changing the api.

share|improve this answer

You are returning by value, so the cost is the same whether you return a copy of the original, vector or a copy of a vector of shared_ptr<T const>: One memory allocation and N atomic increments (approx.).

If what you want to avoid is the creation of the returned vector (i.e. return by value), then it is impossible as different template instantiations are unrelated types no matter how related the arguments to the template are.

share|improve this answer
    
Maybe I didn't phrase the question well enough, sorry for my bad English. I was trying to achieve something like const vector<shared_ptr<const T>>& getTs() { return v_; }. However, this won't work because C++ don't think shared_ptr<const T> and shared_ptr<T> the same type. – icando Oct 15 '12 at 21:53
    
Re: first paragraph: I'm pretty sure that the OP understands that. Hence his/her remark, "If I simply return it, it works, but it needs to reconstruct a vector, which is kind of expensive." (I assume that by "simply return it" (s)he means "return it by value".) – ruakh Oct 15 '12 at 21:54
    
@icando: Yes, that is the second paragraph... shared_ptr<T> and shared_ptr<T const> are completely unrelated types, so that is impossible. – David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 15 '12 at 21:55

Typical solution is to return by const reference:

class X {
  vector<shared_ptr<T>> v_;

 public:
  const vector<shared_ptr<T>>& getTs() const { return v_; }
};

With this return type vector<shared_ptr<T>>& other objects can't modify your internal vector.

BUT nevertheless this breaks the encapsulation. Your v_ is no longer really private part of X - it is only private for writing aspect.

Real encapsulation is this:

class X {
  vector<shared_ptr<T>> v_;

 public:
  class const_ts_iterator  {
  public: 
   //define all necessary stuff
  private:
     vector<shared_ptr<T>>::const_iterator it;
  };
  size_t getTsSize() const { return v_.size; }
  const T* getTsAt(size_t i) const { return v_.at(i).get(); }
  const_ts_iterator beginTs() const { return v_.cbegin(); } 
  const_ts_iterator endTs() const { return v_.cend(); } 
};
share|improve this answer
    
This won't work, because const shared_ptr<T> just prevent the pointer itself being modified, but not the content being pointed to. – icando Oct 15 '12 at 21:57
    
What you need from this vector - why other objects need this read only access to vector? – PiotrNycz Oct 15 '12 at 21:59
    
It is not private even for writing. std::shared_ptr as pointer semantics with the limitation that consts cannot be randomly added in multiple levels. Returning a const reference to the vector still allows you to access the const std::shared_ptr<T>&, and that in turn allows for modification of the stored objects. – David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 15 '12 at 21:59

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