Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How would I round to the nearest 5000 in vb.net. Can't use math.round cause it gives error. I'm looking for something like mround() in microsoft exel.

  Math.round(43333 * 34, 5000)
share|improve this question
    
What error do you get? –  SLaks Oct 15 '12 at 21:42
    
Decimal can only round to between 0 and 28 digits of precision. Parameter name: decimals –  TMan Oct 15 '12 at 21:43
1  
The second parameter to Round() is the number of digits, not the number to round to. –  SLaks Oct 15 '12 at 21:44
    
dang im dumb, how would I round to the nearest 5000 then? –  TMan Oct 15 '12 at 21:46
    
When you say round to the nearest 5000, what result are you looking for? 43333 * 34 should round to... what? 1475000? –  Dan J Oct 15 '12 at 21:46

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try

Math.Round(43000 / 5000) * 5000

As in:

For Each x In New Single() {2499, 2501, 7000, 21000, 43000, 99000}
    Console.WriteLine(String.Format( _
            "Rounding {0,7:N0} to the nearest 5,000: {1,7:N0}", _
            x, _
            Math.Round(x / 5000) * 5000) _
        )
Next

Console.ReadKey(True)

Outputs:

Rounding   2,499 to the nearest 5,000:       0
Rounding   2,501 to the nearest 5,000:   5,000
Rounding   7,000 to the nearest 5,000:   5,000
Rounding  21,000 to the nearest 5,000:  20,000
Rounding  43,000 to the nearest 5,000:  45,000
Rounding  99,000 to the nearest 5,000: 100,000

I'll add that the default rounding behavior for Math.Round is MidpointRounding.ToEven which the documentation describes as "When a number is halfway between two others, it is rounded toward the nearest even number." This means that 0.5 may be rounded to 0 or 1 depending on the circumstances (which is the desired behavior when dealing with statistics). To change this behavior, you can pass MidpointRounding.AwayFromZero as the second parameter, which will behave as you were taught in school (0.5 always rounds to 1, -0.5 always rounds to -1).

share|improve this answer
1  
Isn't the use of Math.Round() superfluous here? / 5000 will already result in integer division. –  Dan J Oct 15 '12 at 21:48
    
@DanJ - you are correct, but I'm assuming that the variables involved are Floats –  JDB Oct 15 '12 at 21:50
1  
You might consider specifying them as non-integer literals, then. ;) Another quirk: this always rounds down, doesn't it? 43333 is closer to 45000 than to 40000... –  Dan J Oct 15 '12 at 21:52
    
@DanJ - Don't think so, as long as the numeral or denominator is a floating point/decimal value. –  JDB Oct 15 '12 at 23:23
1  
@DanJ - Actually, after checking it in the Visual Studios, I've realized that in VB 43000 / 5000 results in a float. You must use 43000 \ 5000 to introduce integer division. The original code would work as-is. I think we were both getting confused with C#, which has the behavior you were referencing. See: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/25bswc76.aspx –  JDB Oct 16 '12 at 13:14

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.