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I am trying to access an html element's prototype through jQuery's .data() function. So far I am very confused.

This is my code:

// start prototype definition for myWidget
var myWidget = function() { 
    console.log('my widget is alive.');
    return this; 
};

myWidget.prototype.chosenSelect = [];

myWidget.prototype.init = function() {
    this.chosenSelect = $('#chooseMe');

    // test 1
    console.log(this.chosenSelect.data());

    // test 2
    console.log(this.chosenSelect.data('chosen'));

    // test3
    console.log(this.chosenSelect.data('Chosen'));

    // test4
    var chosenObject = this.chosenSelect.data();
    console.log(chosenObject.chosen);
};

Test 1 from above returns an object that I was able to look through using Chrome devtools. The object looks like this:

Object
    chosen: Chosen
        changeCallbacks: Array[0]
        etc
        etc
        etc

I want to access the chosen object in that data object. but tests 2 through 4 all return undefined. What could I be doing wrong?

Edit

The prototype is being added to the element from another library. This is an excerpt where the assignment occurs:

Chosen.prototype.init = function(select, zidx, isIE7) {
this.select = select;
this.select.data('chosen', this);
share|improve this question
    
What is #chooseMe? Does it have data attached to it? – Rocket Hazmat Oct 15 '12 at 21:58
    
Yes it should. Another library is operating on a select html element giving it the chosen prototype. See in // test 1 it returns a data object with chosen: Chosen in it. – quakkels Oct 15 '12 at 21:59
1  
Where do you run $('#chooseMe').data('chosen', ...)? – Blender Oct 15 '12 at 22:10
    
@Blender: I assign $('#chooseMe') to this.chosenSelect. Then I run this.chosenSelect.data('chosen'); in // test 2. – quakkels Oct 15 '12 at 22:15
1  
DOM elements are host objects, and host objects don't have to implement any kind of inheritance, much less prototype inheritance. There are browsers in use that don't. You can access an object's internal [[Prototype]] property (if it has one) in some browsers using the Mozilla proprietary __proto__ property or perhaps using object.constructor.prototype, but that may not be the correct object. – RobG Oct 15 '12 at 22:54
up vote 1 down vote accepted
+100

You can access the data object as follows. Here's a working example.

// Set some data on the widget.
jQuery.data($('#chooseMe')[0], "Chosen", {chosen: "Hello!"});

var myWidget = function() {
    console.log('my widget is alive.');
    return this;
};

myWidget.prototype.chosenSelect = [];

myWidget.prototype.init = function() {
    this.chosenSelect = $('#chooseMe')[0];

    // test 1
    console.log(jQuery.data(this.chosenSelect));

    // test 2
    console.log(jQuery.data(this.chosenSelect, "Chosen"));

    // test3
    console.log(jQuery.data(this.chosenSelect, "Chosen").chosen);

    // test4
    var chosenObject = jQuery.data(this.chosenSelect, "Chosen");
    console.log(chosenObject.chosen);
};


myWidget.prototype.init();
share|improve this answer

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