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Reading event description and examples of msdn I can see a discrepancy in the way events are subscribed to. Sometimes event handlers are passed "as is" and other times they are passed by instantiating a delegate using the handler method e.g.

...
class Subscriber
    {
        private string id;
        public Subscriber(string ID, Publisher pub)
        {
            id = ID;
            // Subscribe to the event using C# 2.0 syntax
            pub.RaiseCustomEvent += HandleCustomEvent;
        }

        // Define what actions to take when the event is raised. 
        void HandleCustomEvent(object sender, CustomEventArgs e)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(id + " received this message: {0}", e.Message);
        }
    } 

vs

public delegate void EventHandler1(int i);
...
public class TestClass
{
    public static void Delegate1Method(int i)
    {
        System.Console.WriteLine(i);
    }

    public static void Delegate2Method(string s)
    {
        System.Console.WriteLine(s);
    }
    static void Main()
    {
        PropertyEventsSample p = new PropertyEventsSample();

        p.Event1 += new EventHandler1(TestClass.Delegate1Method);
        p.RaiseEvent1(2);
       ...
     }
}

Can someone please provide clarity on this?

Thanks.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Your first code sample is syntactic sugar for the second one.
This syntax (omitting the constructor) was introduced by C# 2.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't know what "syntactic sugar" is but it sounds like a phrase I will be using more in the future :) –  Nate Oct 15 '12 at 23:25
    
@Nate The spoonful of code/medicine does the same work no matter what. But adding a bit of sugar to it makes it go down a lot easier. –  Chris Sinclair Oct 15 '12 at 23:37
    
3.5 adds some more "syntactic sugar" with the lamda expressions :) –  Wanabrutbeer Oct 16 '12 at 0:06

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