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I'm making a game in python, and I have some code set up as such:

istouching = False
death = True

def checkdead():
    if istouching:
        print "Is touching"     
        death = True

while death is False:
    print death
    game logic

I know the game logic is working, because "Is touching" prints, but then when I print out the value of death, it remains false, any help?

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3 Answers 3

Make checkdead return a value:

def checkdead():
    if istouching:
        print "Is touching"     
        return True

death = checkdead()

You could also use global, as @AshwiniChaudhar shows, but I think it is preferable to write functions that return values instead of functions that modify globals, since such functions can be unit-tested more easily, and it makes explicit what external variables are changed.

PS. if istouching = True should have resulted in a SyntaxError since you can not make a variable assignment inside a conditional expression.

Instead, use

if istouching:
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+1 for discouraging use of globals. –  jathanism Oct 16 '12 at 0:48
    
@jathanism, it's still a global. Just a different style to update it –  gnibbler Oct 16 '12 at 1:40
    
Well, yes, but it's being explicitly mutated vs. implicitly. :) –  jathanism Oct 16 '12 at 15:11

use global to change global variables inside a function, otherwise death=True inside checkdead() will actually define a new local variable.

def checkdead():
    global death
    if istouching == True:      #use == here for comparison
        print "Is touching"     
        death = True
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Yep. The green check-mark goes here. That one has stung me more times than I like to admit. –  Jive Dadson Oct 16 '12 at 0:55
    
Better to use a return variable than modify a global. –  akronymn Oct 16 '12 at 1:01

That's scope-related.

death = False        
def f():
    death = True      # Here python doesn't now death, so it creates a new, different variable
f()
print(death)          # False

death = False       
def f():
    global death
    death = True
f()
print(death)      # True
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1  
A better solution would perhaps be to make it object-oriented and define self.death as an attribute. To avoid 'global death', you could also add a 'return death' statement to your function. –  Christoph Oct 16 '12 at 0:53
    
I upvoted your comment. Why not show the object oriented approach in your answer? –  gnibbler Oct 16 '12 at 1:42

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