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I've finally figured out a way to get TotalPss for individual processes. Now what I am concerned about is, how to find battery consumption per android process, and if there is no direct way of finding that out, is there any correlation between the memory usage per process and the battery consumption? Any research paper that I can look into for that?

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how u resolved your issue ?can u describe –  Erum Hannan Jan 7 at 9:36

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Yes, there is a positive correlation between memory usage, in terms of number of memory accesses, and energy consumption. In other words, the more memory is accessed, the more energy will be consumed.

However, the consumption of energy is largely dominated by the energy usage of the other hardware components that the application is interacting with (e.g., CPU, display, radios, GPS, etc.) as its executing via the Android platform APIs, virtual machine, and OS. This is because memory isn't used in a vacuum, and research has shown that RAM consumes relatively little energy when compared to other hardware components used as an app is executing. In other words, if a memory access is occurring, its because the CPU is executing, which consumes more energy than if the CPU was in an idle state.

For example, consider this following quote based on tests on the HTC Dream (G1) and Nexus One devices, from:

[29] Aaron Carroll and Gernot Heiser, "An analysis of power consumption in a smartphone," presented at the Proceedings of the 2010 USENIX conference on USENIX annual technical conference, Boston, MA, 2010. http://www.nicta.com.au/pub?doc=3587

"The RAM, audio and flash subsystems consistently showed the lowest power consumption. While our micro-benchmarks showed that the peak power of the SD card could be substantial ( 50 mW), in practice the utilisation is low enough such that on average, negligible power is consumed. Even video playback, one of the more data-intensive uses of mobile devices, showed SD power well under 1 % of total power. RAM has similar characteristics; micro-benchmarks showed that RAM power can exceed CPU power in certain workloads, but in practical situations, CPU power overshadows RAM by a factor of two or more. Audio displayed a largely static power consumption in the range of 28–34 mW. Overall, RAM, audio and SD have little effect on the power consumption of the device, and therefore offer little potential for energy optimisation."

As this and other papers say (see my full reference list at the end of this post), energy consumption depends on application use-case scenarios, and the frequency and duration of the use of other hardware components during execution by both your application and other applications that are being context-switched in and out as your app executes.

Measuring energy consumption purely from software is very difficult. The Epof paper mentioned by Kristopher is probably the most recent and complete effort I've seen in this area:

[38] Abhinav Pathak, Y. Charlie Hu, and Ming Zhang (2012), "Fine Grained Energy Accounting on Smartphones with Eprof," in EuroSys'12, Bern, Switzerland, April 10-13, 2012. http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/people/mzh/eurosys-2012.pdf

As of early 2012 the authors were planning on releasing their software as open-source later in the year, but I don't know where this currently stands.

Another paper to examine is the one that produced the PowerTutor app on Google Play, which was a collaboration between the University of Michigan and Google:

[34] Lide Zhang, Birjodh Tiwana, Zhiyun Qian, Zhaoguang Wang, Robert P. Dick, Zhuoqing Morley Mao, and Lei Yang, "Accurate online power estimation and automatic battery behavior based power model generation for smartphones," presented at the Proceedings of the eighth IEEE/ACM/IFIP international conference on Hardware/software codesign and system synthesis, Scottsdale, Arizona, USA, 2010. http://static.googleusercontent.com/external_content/untrusted_dlcp/research.google.com/en/us/pubs/archive/39990.pdf

They do software-only energy usage modeling, but to produce accurate results a model must first be developed on a particular device using more than just software.

If you're asking about the correlation between the amount of memory consumed by a process and energy usage, I don't recall coming across a paper that measured this specifically. However, typically I would think that a process with larger memory consumption would also require more CPU cycles to execute to utilize this memory, which would result in larger energy consumption.

I wrapped up my dissertation on intelligent mobile software to conserve energy for location-based services earlier this year, and read a bunch of papers on mobile energy consumption and profiling in the process. Below are the references I cited that also discuss general energy consumption in context of mobile apps, in case they are useful.

[26] Jeff Sharkley (2009), "Coding for Life--Battery Life, That Is," in Google I/O 2009, San Francisco, CA, May 27, 2009. http://www.google.com/events/io/2009/sessions/CodingLifeBatteryLife.html

[27] Robert Mayo and Parthasarathy Ranganathan, "Energy Consumption in Mobile Devices: Why Future Systems Need Requirements–Aware Energy Scale-Down - Power-Aware Computer Systems." Vol. 3164, B. Falsafi and T. VijayKumar, Eds., ed: Springer Berlin / Heidelberg, 2005, pp. 301-463. http://goo.gl/8ClFQ

[28] Gerard Bosch Creus and Mika Kuulusa, Optimizing Mobile Software with Built-in Power Profiling: Springer, 2007. http://goo.gl/YlNmU

[29] Aaron Carroll and Gernot Heiser, "An analysis of power consumption in a smartphone," presented at the Proceedings of the 2010 USENIX conference on USENIX annual technical conference, Boston, MA, 2010. http://www.nicta.com.au/pub?doc=3587

[30] Aqeel Mahesri and Vibhore Vardhan, "Power Consumption Breakdown on a Modern Laptop - Power-Aware Computer Systems." Vol. 3471, B. Falsafi and T. VijayKumar, Eds., ed: Springer Berlin / Heidelberg, 2005, pp. 165-180. http://goo.gl/D7XDL

[31] Rajesh Palit, Ajit Singh, and Kshirasagar Naik, "Modeling the energy cost of applications on portable wireless devices," presented at the Proceedings of the 11th international symposium on Modeling, analysis and simulation of wireless and mobile systems, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, 2008. http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=1454562

[32] T. Farrell, R. Lange, and K. Rothermel (2007), "Energy-efficient Tracking of Mobile Objects with Early Distance-based Reporting," in Mobile and Ubiquitous Systems: Networking & Services, 2007. MobiQuitous 2007. Fourth Annual International Conference on, pp. 1-8, 6-10 Aug. 2007. http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/login.jsp?tp=&arnumber=4450984&url=http%3A%2F%2Fieeexplore.ieee.org%2Fxpls%2Fabs_all.jsp%3Farnumber%3D4450984

[34] Lide Zhang, Birjodh Tiwana, Zhiyun Qian, Zhaoguang Wang, Robert P. Dick, Zhuoqing Morley Mao, and Lei Yang, "Accurate online power estimation and automatic battery behavior based power model generation for smartphones," presented at the Proceedings of the eighth IEEE/ACM/IFIP international conference on Hardware/software codesign and system synthesis, Scottsdale, Arizona, USA, 2010. http://static.googleusercontent.com/external_content/untrusted_dlcp/research.google.com/en/us/pubs/archive/39990.pdf

[35] J. Eberle and G. P. Perrucci (2011), "Energy measurements campaign for positioning methods on State-of-the-Art smartphones," in Consumer Communications and Networking Conference (CCNC), 2011 IEEE, pp. 937-941, 9-12 Jan. 2011. http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/login.jsp?tp=&arnumber=5766645&url=http%3A%2F%2Fieeexplore.ieee.org%2Fxpls%2Fabs_all.jsp%3Farnumber%3D5766645

[36] M. Kjaergaard (2012), "Minimizing the Power Consumption of Location-Based Services on Mobile Phones," Pervasive Computing, IEEE, Vol. 11 pp. 67-73. http://goo.gl/ymJuZ

[38] Abhinav Pathak, Y. Charlie Hu, and Ming Zhang (2012), "Fine Grained Energy Accounting on Smartphones with Eprof," in EuroSys'12, Bern, Switzerland, April 10-13, 2012. http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/people/mzh/eurosys-2012.pdf

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quite a thorough bibliography (which I also assume is copy and pasted from your dissertation :-)... –  Kristopher Micinski Oct 22 '12 at 3:45
    
@KristopherMicinski Yes, my dissertation definitely helped with the bibliography section :) –  Sean Barbeau Oct 22 '12 at 13:23
    
:) Thank you so much barbeau. It was an amazing answer. –  Jonathan Oct 23 '12 at 0:57

There is no correlation between memory usage and battery use. It takes the same amount of energy to store "nothing" as it does "something" in memory.

If there is a lot of reading and writing going on, then yes it does affect it, but just being there doesn't.

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You should take a look at Eprof, the associated paper:

Fine Grained Energy Accounting on Smartphones with Eprof

Gives its account of the tool. The answer is that memory usage on a per process basis isn't really the cause of battery drain, it's more the operations those individual apps perform. I urge you to read the paper and use the tool on your own apps to figure out how it works, though!

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Hi Kristopher, I read the paper. From what I can understand, with Eprof I can just estimate how much battery my app is draining. not all the apps on the phone. I am looking for a way that can help me find the battery consumption per app for all the apps that are running on the phone –  Jonathan Oct 22 '12 at 0:42
    
@Jonathan it doesn't make sense what you mean here, because apps don't use battery on an individual basis. What constitutes an app's battery power? It doesn't make any sense, because there's way too much kernel involvement going on. Additionally, most battery usage happens because of radios, etc.., who is to say how each of these belong to a specific process? However, while still approximate, you might want to look at powertop for Android: gitorious.org/android/powertop –  Kristopher Micinski Oct 22 '12 at 0:48
    
@Jonathan it also appears that you seem to be miscalculating how power is consumed on these devices. Power is mainly consumed by sources other than apps, the overwhelming majority of the time, such that power usage of an individual app will be masked by the power usage of the system as a whole, perhaps it would help to think about why you want to know this? –  Kristopher Micinski Oct 22 '12 at 0:51
    
Thats what I told my professor too. But he keeps on insisting that there are ways to estimate which processes are draining how much battery. The project at hand is to design an app that gives an estimate of battery consumption per process, so that the user can quit the processes that are draining most of the battery. –  Jonathan Oct 22 '12 at 0:53
    
@Jonathan that is mostly complete crap, that's not how power consumption works, the Android scheduler is always going to have an app running regardless, when an app hasn't been used for a while it gets kicked out of memory, and another app takes its place. However, the thing that does consume power is when apps hold locks unnecessarily, and that's what you should be interested in. synergy.ucsd.edu/files/… that paper addresses that problem –  Kristopher Micinski Oct 22 '12 at 0:55

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