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So I have a class called cell:

class cell:
    possibles = [ "1", "2", "3", "4", "5", "6", "7", "8", "9" ]
    value = None;

    def __init__(self, value):
        if value == "":
            self.value = "0"
        else:
            self.value = value

if __name__=="__main__":
    mlist = [cell("2"), cell("6"), cell("8")]
    mlist[2].possibles.remove("3")
    print mlist[0].possibles

The output is:

['1', '2', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8', '9']

Why would it remove a value from possibles in the first item of the array, when I explicitly removed it from the third item?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is a common Python gotcha. The way this is written every cell has a reference to the same list instance. You can check this by printing id(mlist[i].possibles) for each i.

To create separate lists, move the initialization to the constructor:

def __init__(self, value):
    self.possibles = [ "1", "2", "3", "4", "5", "6", "7", "8", "9" ]
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I wish I could mod this and the post directly below. Thank you! –  sjensen85 Oct 16 '12 at 4:15
mlist = [cell("2"), cell("6"), cell("8")]

here you don't have three different lists, but three references to the same list. Any change affects all.

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This is happening because you have defined possibilities to be a class variable, not an instance variable.

Move possibilities into __init__ (as self.possibilities), and you should be fine

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As others have said, you should make possibles an instance variable. You can also do without the if...else clause by making the value parameter default to 0.

    class cell:
        def __init__(self, value=0):
            self.possibles = [ "1", "2", "3", "4", "5", "6", "7", "8", "9" ]
            self.value = value

    if __name__=="__main__":
        mlist = [cell("2"), cell("6"), cell("8")]
        mlist[2].possibles.remove("3")


>>> mlist[0].possibles
['1', '2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8', '9']
>>> mlist[2].possibles
['1', '2', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8', '9']
>>> 
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