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I'm trying to query two fairly large tables here to pull some results and having some trouble with effeciency.

Note: I've only included relevant columns to make this not look so messy!

TableA (Stock) has productID, ownerID, and count columns

TableB (Owners) has ID, accountHolderID, and name columns

What I'm trying to do is query TableA and where productID = X pull up Stock.productID, Stock.accountHolderID and Owners.name. The relation between these two tables is Stock.ownerID = Owners.ID so if the WHERE condition pulled say five productIDs then I'd want the name from TableB that matched up to the ownerID from TableA.

The only unique ID in this situation is Owners.ID from TableB

Just doing a basic SELECT query on TableA for those products takes 15 seconds however when I add an INNER JOIN to match things up to TableB the query takes significantly longer, upwards of 10 minutes. I'm guessing I've designed this query inefficiently.

SELECT
Owners.name,
Stock.productID,
Stock.ownerID
FROM Stock
INNER JOIN 
Owners
ON Stock.ownerID = Owners.ID
WHERE
Stock.productID = 42301679

How can I make this query more efficient?

Would adding ORs to the WHERE condition allow me to pull multiple productIDs at once?

share|improve this question
    
15 seconds seems a long time. May I ask the environment? –  Nick Maroulis Oct 16 '12 at 1:20
    
Seems to be a pretty standard query. What are the row counts on the tables, and what indexes are there? Also, what DBMS are you using? (mysql, oracle, etc). My first guess is missing indexes. –  Jody Oct 16 '12 at 1:21
    
Just did the basic SELECT query again to check for timing, it's actually 9 seconds. mySQL environment. The Stock table contains just under 21,489,000 entries, the Owners table is about 439,000 –  Jay Oct 16 '12 at 1:26
    
Indexes are as follows: ownerID ownerID Normal BTREE, name_unique name UNIQUE BTREE –  Jay Oct 16 '12 at 1:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Based on your comment, it looks like you're missing a very critical index on the owners.id field. Now, keep in mind this index will help this query, but you have to take into consideration all of the other queries that run against this table to determine if it is a good idea to add that index.

At 29M rows, having an index on a table that is frequently inserted to may have a noticeable effect on insert times.

This may be a situation where different applications need different indexes - namely your OLTP app and your reporting app (which may just be you running ad hoc queries). A common solution is to have a second server that runs your reporting/data warehouse queries that has indexes properly tuned to this function.

Best of luck.

share|improve this answer
    
Good point Jody. Sadly the Owners table is in a state of constant flux with update queries running against it constantly in real-time due to the nature of the database. I'm guessing the performance tradeoff would be significant if I were to index it further? Although it's mostly just update queries rather than INSERTs, other rows are changed but the IDs aren't besides the occasional new one so would indexing the IDs be worth it in that situation? –  Jay Oct 16 '12 at 2:17
    
It's always hard to say how adding an index will affect performance. I'm not sure if the updates would require an update to the index the way an insert would. My suggestion would be to isolate the DB and run some benchmarking tests with and without a new index, and generally proceed very carefully and with lots of buy-in from stakeholders. Also, keep in mind that the index will need to cover both fields being selected to be most effective. –  Jody Oct 16 '12 at 4:05

If the productID is unique in the Stock table, it makes sense to make this the index and this can greatly improve performance as others have mentioned.

Another performance gain comes from setting a specific length Owner.name field. In mySQL, VARCHAR can be used for Strings of varied length while a CHAR(32) column indicates that the name will always occupy 32 characters. The extra unused space is just padded, so you can really think of the (32) as indicating a maximum length. The performance advantage comes from the fact that the database now knows exactly how many bytes each row occupies and it can use this information to improve lookup time.

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Sadly the productID is not a unique field with most being used thousands of times. Cutting down the Owner.name field is most likely an option though. Thanks –  Jay Oct 16 '12 at 2:16

Your'e query looks right perhaps we can see the schema

In order to pull multiple productIDs at once you can use the IN operator instead of OR

SELECT
Owners.name,
Stock.productID,
Stock.ownerID
FROM Stock
INNER JOIN 
Owners
ON Stock.ownerID = Owners.ID
WHERE
Stock.productID IN (42301679,123232,232324)
share|improve this answer
    
Oh I completely forgot about IN, that's helpful thank you =) –  Jay Oct 16 '12 at 1:26

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