Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Using vanilla MVC I can revalidate my model with TryValidateModel. The TryValidateModel method doesn't seem to be applicable to WebAPI. How can I revalidate my model when using WebAPI?

share|improve this question
    
What do you mean by How can I revalidate my model when using WebAPI? ? – gdoron Oct 16 '12 at 1:33
    
I'm looking for the same functionality in WebAPI as TryValidateModel provides in MVC. If my model state, after initial databinding, is invalid I want to make some changes to it and then revalidate. How Can I rerun that validation process? In MVC this is easily accomplished with TryValidateModel. – Mark S. Oct 16 '12 at 1:37

I know it has been a while since this has been asked, but the problem is still valid. Thus i thought i should share my solution to this problem. I decided to implement the TryValidateModel(object model) myself, based on the implementation in the System.Web.Mvc.Controller.cs

The problem is that the mvc's TryValidateModel internally used their own HttpContext and ModelState. If you go and compaire the two, they are very similar....

The be able to use our own HttpContext there exists a HttpContextWrapper that can be used for that.
And Since we have to clear our model state, it doesn't really matter that we use a different type of ModelState , as long as we get the desired result, thus i create a new ModelState object from the correct type...
I did add the error to the ModelState of the controller and not to the model state to the newly created ModelState , This seems to work just fine for me :)
Here is my code, that i just added to the controller...
do not forget to import the library...

using System.Web.ModelBinding;

    protected internal bool TryValidateModel(object model)
    {
        return TryValidateModel(model, null /* prefix */);
    }

    protected internal bool TryValidateModel(object model, string prefix)
    {
        if (model == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("model");
        }

        ModelMetadata metadata = ModelMetadataProviders.Current.GetMetadataForType(() => model, model.GetType());
        var t = new ModelBindingExecutionContext(new HttpContextWrapper(HttpContext.Current), new System.Web.ModelBinding.ModelStateDictionary());

        foreach (ModelValidationResult validationResult in ModelValidator.GetModelValidator(metadata, t).Validate(null))
        {
            ModelState.AddModelError(validationResult.MemberName, validationResult.Message);
        }

        return ModelState.IsValid;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Awesome, thanks! – bbodenmiller Nov 11 '13 at 1:33
    
How can this be up modified to work recursively? – bbodenmiller Nov 11 '13 at 2:08
    
@bbodenmiller what do you mean? Although i haven't tried it, i think it should work for any nested resources, unless msft does something weird (which is still probable...) – rik.vanmechelen Nov 12 '13 at 8:21
    
TryValidateModel doesn't support nested validation as per stackoverflow.com/questions/4465432/… which I imagine is why this also does not support nested validation. :( – bbodenmiller Nov 13 '13 at 22:46
    
Ah, that would make sense. Thank you for mentioning it. following stackoverflow.com/questions/4384081/… you could use the same method of validation for the navigational properties (nested resources) – rik.vanmechelen Nov 14 '13 at 8:39

Based from rik-vanmechelen original answer, here is my version that relies on the services container exposed by Web API.

    /// <summary>
    /// Tries to validate the model.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="model">The model.</param>
    /// <returns>Whether the model is valid or not.</returns>
    protected internal bool TryValidateModel(object model)
    {
        if (model == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("model");
        }

        var metadataProvider = Configuration.Services.GetService<System.Web.Http.Metadata.ModelMetadataProvider>();
        var validatorProviders = Configuration.Services.GetServices<System.Web.Http.Validation.ModelValidatorProvider>();
        var metadata = metadataProvider.GetMetadataForType(() => model, model.GetType());

        ModelState.Clear();
        var modelValidators = metadata.GetValidators(validatorProviders);
        foreach (var validationResult in modelValidators.SelectMany(v => v.Validate(metadata, null)))
        {
            ModelState.AddModelError(validationResult.MemberName, validationResult.Message);
        }

        return ModelState.IsValid;
    }

This uses the following simple extension methods to access the services :

  /// <summary>
  /// Services container extension methods.
  /// </summary>
  public static class ServicesContainerExtensions
  {
    /// <summary>
    /// Gets the service.
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="TService">The type of the service.</typeparam>
    /// <param name="services">The services.</param>
    /// <returns>The service.</returns>
    /// <exception cref="System.ArgumentNullException">services</exception>
    public static TService GetService<TService>(this ServicesContainer services)
    {
        if (services == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("services");
        }
        return (TService)((object)services.GetService(typeof(TService)));
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets the services.
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="TService">The type of the service.</typeparam>
    /// <param name="services">The services.</param>
    /// <returns>The services.</returns>
    /// <exception cref="System.ArgumentNullException">services</exception>
    public static IEnumerable<TService> GetServices<TService>(this ServicesContainer services)
    {
        if (services == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("services");
        }
        return services.GetServices(typeof(TService)).Cast<TService>();
    }
}

The advantage of using this method is that it reuses the MetadataProvider and ValidatorProvider(s) you have configured for your Web API application while the previous answer is retrieving the one configured in ASP.NET MVC. ASP.NET MVC and WebAPI run through different pipelines.

share|improve this answer
    
Please explain why this is better than rik.vanmechelen's answer. – bbodenmiller Nov 11 '13 at 1:23
    
I edited my answer with an explanation. – Onlyann Nov 25 '13 at 23:16
    
Where does the second code block go? – bbodenmiller Nov 26 '13 at 0:51
    
The second block goes anywhere. This defines extension methods for the ServicesContainer type used by the first block. – Onlyann Nov 26 '13 at 7:16
    
Interesting :) but if get it correctly, it is only necessary when you have created custom MetadataProviders etc.? – rik.vanmechelen Jan 10 '14 at 8:34
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Turns out TryValidateModel is not supported in WebAPI. There's a feature request over on CodePlex.

share|improve this answer
1  
Do you by any chance have a link to that issue, or remember what it was called? (I know it's been a year, but nothing ventured, right?) – Sixten Otto Oct 7 '13 at 22:45
    
@SixtenOtto I added an aswer with a possible workaround to the problem. I hope it might help you as well. – rik.vanmechelen Oct 30 '13 at 8:46
    
I sure can't find it on CodePlex... – bbodenmiller Nov 11 '13 at 1:19
    
I don't know when was it added but now there is Validate method on controller. ApiController.Validate<TEntity> Method (TEntity) msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dn573258%28v=vs.118%29.aspx – hex Jun 11 '15 at 21:35

I don't know when was it added but now there is Validate method on api controller.

ApiController.Validate Method (TEntity) https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dn573258%28v=vs.118%29.aspx

share|improve this answer

TryValidateMethod is not present for WebAPI, here is an alternate solution which might help...

Once you have fixed the error items, you can clear the ModelState using

ModelState.Clear();

and then revalidate using

ModelState.IsValid
share|improve this answer
    
Looking at the Web API source, there's nothing that suggests to me that invoking IsValid causes re-validation to occur. Are you sure this actually does something? – Sixten Otto Oct 7 '13 at 22:48

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.