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I am trying to get my program to limit what the user can type in. It keeps returning an "Expected an indented block" error from my code below.

deliverydetails = input("Is your order for delivery?\n Press 1 for delivery. Press 2 for pickup")

if deliverydetails == "1":

##    def delivery ():

    print ("Order for Delivery")
    customerfirstname = " "
    while len(customerfirstname) <3 or len(customerfirstname)>30 or customerfirstname.isalpha() != True:
    customerfirstname = input("Customer First Name: ** must be 4 characters long  + " ")                         
    while len(customersurname) < 3 or len(customersurname) > 30 or     customerfirstname.isalpha() != True:                        
    customersurname = input("Customer Surname:" + " ")
    customerstreet = input("Street name:" + " ")
    customerstreetnumber = input("Street number:" + " ")
    customercity = input("City:" + " ")
    customersuburb = input("Suburb (If none, leave blank):" + " ")
    latestOrder.append(customerfirstname)
    latestOrder.append(customersurname)
    latestOrder.append(customerstreet)
    latestOrder.append(customerstreetnumber)
    latestOrder.append(customercity)
    latestOrder.append(customersuburb)
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5  
You don't appear to have indented anything, so that could be the problem. In python when you start a block (an if or while statement above) you need to tab everything over underneath it. –  Hunter McMillen Oct 16 '12 at 1:40
    
In my program, I had indented things however when I do the error EOL while scanning string literal comes up, what does this mean? –  Ella Donaldson Oct 16 '12 at 1:53
2  
@EllaDonaldson, that means you are missing a closing quote on one of the strings. It looks like the line customerfirstname = input(... here is missing a ". Notice that the following line are red indicating –  John La Rooy - AKA gnibbler Oct 16 '12 at 2:13

3 Answers 3

Python uses indentation to group blocks of code. After the while statements, you want to indent the lines below it that should be executed inside the while loop.

Here are some other tips that may be useful: - Use pylint to check your syntax. It will uncover a lot of errors that you would otherwise only find out during runtime. - Use spaces to indent. Don't use tabs. That's a PEP 8 style recommendation

Here is the corrected version of your code:

deliverydetails = input("Is your order for delivery?\n Press 1 for delivery. Press 2 for pickup")

if deliverydetails == "1":
##    def delivery ():
    print ("Order for Delivery")
    customerfirstname = " "
    customersurname = " "

    while len(customerfirstname) <3 or len(customerfirstname)>30 or customerfirstname.isalpha() != True:
        customerfirstname = input("Customer First Name: ** must be 4 characters long  + " ")                         

    while len(customersurname) < 3 or len(customersurname) > 30 or     customerfirstname.isalpha() != True:                        
        customersurname = input("Customer Surname:" + " ")

    customerstreet = input("Street name:" + " ")
    customerstreetnumber = input("Street number:" + " ")
    customercity = input("City:" + " ")
    customersuburb = input("Suburb (If none, leave blank):" + " ")
    latestOrder.append(customerfirstname)
    latestOrder.append(customersurname)
    latestOrder.append(customerstreet)
    latestOrder.append(customerstreetnumber)
    latestOrder.append(customercity)
    latestOrder.append(customersuburb)
share|improve this answer

Python uses intentation instead of {} or begin/end, so for example this line

while len(customerfirstname) <3 or len(customerfirstname)>30 or customerfirstname.isalpha() != True:

should be followed by an indented block. An indented block can be as short as a single line, usually you should indent it 4 spaces more than the while

Aside: it may be clearer to write that line as

while not (3 <= len(customerfirstname) <= 30 and customerfirstname.isalpha()):
share|improve this answer

Make sure to indent the lines that are part of the loop. That's the only way Python has to know what part you want to loop.

delivery_details = input("Is your order for delivery?\n Press 1 for delivery. Press 2 for pickup")

if delivery_details == "1":
    print "Order for Delivery"

    customer_first_name = ""
    while len(customer_first_name) < 3 or len(customer_first_name) > 30 or not customer_first_name.isalpha():
        customer_first_name = input("First name (must be 4 characters long): ")

    customer_surname       = input("Surname: ")
    customer_street        = input("Street name: ")
    customer_street_number = input("Street number: ")
    customer_city          = input("City: ")
    customer_suburb        = input("Suburb (If none, leave blank): ")

    latest_order.append(customer_first_name)
    latest_order.append(customer_surname)
    latest_order.append(customer_street)
    latest_order.append(customer_street_number)
    latest_order.append(customer_city)
    latest_order.append(customer_suburb)

For what it's worth I've made some stylistic changes for readability. Some extra spacing, blank lines, and underscores in variable names make everything a bit easier on the eyes.

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