Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So I have the += operator overloaded in a way that attempts to take advantage of the + operator that I've already defined. Namely that Polynomial + Polynomial returns a new Polynomial. So my += function basically tries to call this + function with the LHS as *this and the RHS as *this + B (where B is a Polynomial object passed by const reference to the function). I am getting an error. Where am I going wrong with this?

#include <iostream>
#include <ctime>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <cmath>

using namespace std;
void line(int lines);


class Polynomial
{
    private:
        int degree;
        double* coeffs;
    public:
        //constructors
        Polynomial() {degree=0;coeffs=new double[1];}
        Polynomial(int deg) {degree=deg;coeffs=new double[deg+1];}
        Polynomial(const Polynomial& A);

        //mutators
        void GetCoeffs(istream& in);
        void EditCoeff(int deg);
        void ResetCoeffs();
        int Coeff(int deg);
        void Randomize(int max);

        //accessors
        void Show(ostream& out);
        int Degree() {return degree;}

        //operators
        Polynomial operator+(const Polynomial& B); //Polynomial + Polynomial
        friend Polynomial operator +(double c, Polynomial& A); //c + Polynomial
        Polynomial operator +(double c); //Polynomial + c
        void operator +=(const Polynomial& B); //Polynomial+=Polynomial
        void operator =(Polynomial& A);
        Polynomial operator*(int k);
        Polynomial operator*(Polynomial& A);

};



int main()
{
    Polynomial A(5);
    A.Randomize(4);
    A.Show(cout);
    line(2);
    Polynomial B=A+8;
    B.Show(cout);




    return 0;
}

Polynomial Polynomial::operator*(int k)
{
    Polynomial C(degree);
    C=*this;
    for (int i=degree; i>=0; i--)
        C.coeffs[i]*=k;
    return C;
}

Polynomial operator +(double c, Polynomial& A)
{
    Polynomial C=A;
    C.coeffs[0]+=c;
    return C;
}
Polynomial Polynomial::operator +(double c)
{
    Polynomial C=*this;
    C.coeffs[0]+=c;
    return C;
}

void Polynomial::Randomize(int max)
{
    for (int i=degree; i>=0; i--)
    {
        coeffs[i]=rand()%(max+1) + 1;
        if ((rand()%(101) + 1)%2 == 0)
            coeffs[i]*=-1;
    }
}

void Polynomial::operator =(Polynomial& A)
{
    if (degree==A.degree)
    {
        for (int i=degree; i>=0; i--)
        {
            coeffs[i]=A.coeffs[i];
        }
    }
}

Polynomial Polynomial::operator+(const Polynomial& B)
{

    if (degree>=B.degree)
    {
        Polynomial C(degree);
        C=*this;

        for (int i=B.degree; i>=0; i--)
        {
            C.coeffs[i]=coeffs[i]+B.coeffs[i];
        }
        return C;
    }
    else
    {
        Polynomial C=B;

        for (int i=degree; i>=0; i--)
        {
            C.coeffs[i]=coeffs[i]+B.coeffs[i];
        }
        return C;

    }

}

void Polynomial::operator+=(const Polynomial& B)
{
    *this = (*this + B);
}

int Polynomial::Coeff(int deg)
{
    return coeffs[deg];
}

void line(int lines)
{
    for (int i=0; i<lines; i++)
        cout << endl;
}

void Polynomial::GetCoeffs(istream& in)
{
    for (int i=degree; i>=0; i--)
    {
        in >> coeffs[i];
    }
    in.ignore();
}

void Polynomial::Show(ostream& out)
{

    if (coeffs[degree]>0)
                cout << "   ";
    for (int i=degree; i>=0; i--)
    {


        if (coeffs[i]>=0)
        {
            if (i!=degree)
                out << " + ";
            out << coeffs[i];


        }
        else
        {
            if (coeffs[i]<0)
                out << " - ";
                out << 0-coeffs[i];
        }
        if (i>1)
            out << "x^" << i;
        else if (i==1)
            out << "x";

    }
}

Polynomial::Polynomial(const Polynomial& A)
{
    coeffs=new double[A.degree+1];
    degree=A.degree;
    for (int i=A.degree; i>=0; i--)
    {
        coeffs[i]=A.coeffs[i];

    }

}

Polynomial Polynomial::operator*(Polynomial& A)
{
    int deg=A.degree+degree;
    Polynomial P(deg);

    for (int i=deg; i>=0; i--)
        P.coeffs[i]=0;



    for (int i=deg; i>=0; i--)
    {
        for (int j=A.degree; j>=0; j--)
        {
            P.coeffs[i+j]+=coeffs[i]*A.coeffs[j];
        }
    }

    return P;


}
share|improve this question
2  
I highly recommend you use std::vector<double> instead of double *. –  chris Oct 16 '12 at 2:29
    
What's the error? –  Kevin Ballard Oct 16 '12 at 2:32
    
in the operator =+ definition it says it doesn't recognize the function (the line that reads " *this=(*this+B) " ) –  BrownBeard93423 Oct 16 '12 at 2:46
    
Please see Operator overloading for some good guidelines. –  Blastfurnace Oct 16 '12 at 2:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your problem is that *this + B is a temporary, and temporary objects can't be bound to non-const references.

Of course, there's no reason that the RHS of an assignment can't be const. Try:

void operator=(/* HERE */ const Polynomial& A);

Most of your other operators aren't using const where they should either. For example:

Polynomial operator+(const Polynomial& B) /* HERE */ const; //Polynomial + Polynomial
friend Polynomial operator +(double c, /* HERE */ const Polynomial& A); //c + Polynomial

Only assignment operators should be non-const members, and they should accept const right operands. Normal binary operators that create new objects should be const wrt both left and right operands.

share|improve this answer
    
What do you mean by "temporary objects can't be bound to non-const references" ? –  BrownBeard93423 Oct 16 '12 at 3:18
    
I mean exactly that. If you have int i; void f(int&); you can't say f(i+4);, because i+4 is a temporary, not an lvalue, and f(int&) accepts only an lvalue reference. –  Ben Voigt Oct 16 '12 at 5:42
    
Remember that you overrode operator=, so the line *this = *this + B; turns into this->operator=(this->operator+(B)). Your operator+ returns a temporary value, operator= needs an lvalue. By changing the signature to include const like I showed, the temporary becomes acceptable. –  Ben Voigt Oct 16 '12 at 5:44

Often it is done other way around. People make binary + operator (usually non-member) that takes advantage of += operator (a member) that is already defined.

share|improve this answer
2  
Specifically, Polynomial operator+(Polynomial lhs, const Polynomial& rhs) { return lhs += rhs; } –  Robᵩ Oct 16 '12 at 2:35
    
I acknowledge that's the case and I appreciate you pointing that out, but I still need to understand why my specific code isn't working. It's not enough for me to understand a different way of doing it that does work, I need to know why this fails :/ –  BrownBeard93423 Oct 16 '12 at 2:51

Where am I going wrong with this?

  • You should use std::vector instead of a raw pointer.
  • You have violated the rule of three.
  • You didn't follow the convention creating a member operator+= and a free operator+.

Try this:

// UNTESTED
class Polynomial
{
    private:
        std::vector<double> coeffs;

    public:
        //constructors
        Polynomial() : coeffs(1) {}
        Polynomial(int deg) : coeffs(deg+1) {}
        // Don't need copy constructor
        // Don't need destructor
        // Don't need assignment operator

        ...
        int Degree() {return coeffs.size()-1;}

        //operators
        Polynomial& operator+=(const Polynomial& B) {
            if(Degree() < B.Degree())
              coeffs.resize(B.Degree()+1);
            for(int i = 0; i <= B.Degree(); ++i)
              coeffs[i] += B.coeffs[i];
            return *this;
        }    
};

Polynomial operator+(Polynomial A, const Polynomial& B) {
  return A += B;
}
share|improve this answer
    
am i correct in thinking you return the class object in your += function so you can chain += statements (i.e. A += B += C) ? –  BrownBeard93423 Oct 16 '12 at 5:15
    
like i mentioned to the other guy, I very much appreciate being shown the orthodox ways that DO work, but even more valuable to me than that is if I can understand why my code did not work, especially the line *this = *this + B ... I don't completely understand Ben Voigt's explanation of why that line failed. –  BrownBeard93423 Oct 16 '12 at 5:18

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.