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Here is my code so far:

public class PostfixCalculator {

   private Stack<Float> stack;
   private float result;

   private Boolean isOperator (char op){
    boolean operator;
    switch (op){
        case '+':
        case '-':
        case '*':
        case '/':
        case '^':
            operator = true;
            break;
    default:
        operator = false;
        break;}
    return operator;
}

private Boolean isFunction (String func){
    String[] functions = {"sin", "cos", "max"};
    for (int i=0; i<functions.length; i++){
        if (func.equals(functions[i]))
            return true; }
    return false;
}

private void computeOperator (float op1, float op2, char op){
    switch (op){
        case '+': 
            result = op1 + op2;
            break; 
        case '-': 
            result = op1 - op2;
            break;
        case '/': 
            result = op1/op2;
            break;
        case '*': 
            result = op1 * op2; 
            break;
        case '^': 
            result = (float) Math.pow(op1, op2);
            break;

        default:
            break;
    }   
}

public float calculate(String expr) throws IllegalArgumentException {
    result = 0;
    String token;
    Float makeit;
    char operator;
    float op1, op2, pushFloat;
    StringTokenizer calc=new StringTokenizer(expr);

    stack = new Stack<Float>();

    while (calc.hasNextToken()){
        token=calc.getNextToken();
        operator=token.charAt(0);

        if (!(this.isOperator(operator))){
            if (this.isFunction(token)){
                if (token.equals("sin")){
                    op1=stack.pop();
                    result = (float) Math.sin(op1);
                    stack.push(result);
                }
                else if (token.equals("cos")){
                    op1=stack.pop();
                    result = (float) Math.cos(op1);
                    stack.push(result);
                }
                else if (token.equals("max")){
                    op1=stack.pop();
                    op2=stack.pop();
                    result=Math.max(op1, op2);
                    stack.push(result);
                }

            }
            else {
                makeit = new Float(token);
                pushFloat = makeit.floatValue();
                stack.push(pushFloat);
            }

        }
        else {
            op1 = stack.pop();
            op2 = stack.pop();
            computeOperator (op1, op2, operator);
            stack.push(result);


        }
    }
    return stack.pop();
}

}

I think I have the basics of it down, but how do I deal with postfix calculations with three digits in a row or more, like for example '2 3 4 * -'? Any help would be appreciated. Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
    
For uniformity/understandability, result should be a local, and computeOperator should return a value you assign to result. –  Hot Licks Oct 16 '12 at 3:47
    
And have two functions -- computeMonadic and computeDiadic. Handle max and your "operators" in computeDiadic. Replace isOperator with isMonadic or isDiadic. (No need to use charAt -- just treat all operator/function names as strings.) –  Hot Licks Oct 16 '12 at 3:49
    
If you wanted to get fancy you could have an Operator class or such and create subclasses for each operator/function you have. Build an array of Operator subclasses and index that to find your operation. (But this would be "extra credit".) –  Hot Licks Oct 16 '12 at 3:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Yep, a stack. And one can implement a simple stack easily with an array and a counter -- no real need to use a fancy class.

The array would be as large as the most deeply nested expression that you can handle (10 elements should be sufficient for virtually all "real" problems).

Push is update A[i] and increment i. Pop is decrement i and reference A[i]. "8 9 +" is push(8), push(9), pop the top two elements, add them, push the result. Note that operators are never pushed, only operands/results.

'2 3 4 * -' would be push(2), push(3), push(4), pop top two, multiply, push result, pop two, subtract, push result.

"7 6 + cos" would be push(7), push(6), pop two, add, push result, pop one, perform "cos", push result.

Error if you need to pop an element and the counter is zero (eg, "7 +" -- you'd want to pop twice but you can only pop once). Also an error if the user expresses "finished" and there is more than one element in the stack.

Always "display" your top element, as that's the last value pushed or the result.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the help. I have a stack implemented, and I'm pushing it in order I think, but for some reason 2 3 4 * - is doing 4-(2*3) instead. After I check to see if it's a function or operator, I push the token into the stack, but am I skipping things or doing it in the wrong order somehow? –  Akaraka Oct 16 '12 at 3:13
    
@Akaraka - It sounds like (haven't tried to decipher your code) you're pushing the operator (or function) into the stack. With this scheme you never push operators/functions -- only values. (And, as indicated by the other post, you treat operators and functions exactly the same.) –  Hot Licks Oct 16 '12 at 3:42
    
I looked over my code and I don't think I'm pushing operators/functions into the stack, since I check to see if it's a function or operator first before pushing into a stack...am I overlooking something somewhere? Thanks for the help! –  Akaraka Oct 16 '12 at 3:54
    
@Akaraka -- Glancing at your code, I don't see anything obvious. (But see my suggestions.) You should concentrate on why you don't compute (3*4) immediately after recognizing the "*", eg. Add a few System.out.println calls to follow what your code is doing. –  Hot Licks Oct 16 '12 at 3:57

For a calculator like this, you should use a stack. Every number is a push and every operation has a corresponding action.

st = []
while input:
  if isanumber(input.next()): st.push(input.consume())
  else: #its an operator
    #note this may be wrong for operators that have a specific order
    if(input.next() == "+"): 
      stack.push(stack.pop() + stack.pop())
    # more operations
    input.consume()
print(st)

And that would be the rough python to do it, in this instance I look ahead a single token before making a decision.

edit:

Probably should have read your code before posting, anyway you must always push back the computed number, also attempt to simplify your code into only "functions" and "numbers" making functions that perform both. Regex is also useful for this sort of thing, such as the http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/std/regex/.

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