Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm interested in implementing a "single line" counter / progress bar in Common Lisp. Nothing fancy, just something like:

=>

==>

===> ... etc..

And then have it start over again. Or maybe count the number of nodes I've visited.

But, I want to do this all on one line, and clear the previously printed characters. For example, in Python, it would be something like:

for i in range(0,1000):    
    print "\r",i,"   "

Which would then count, but keep everything on a single line, while clearing everything printed on that line before any given iteration.

I know in lisp there is (format t "text" #\return), but that doesn't seem to work.

Does anyone know how I might do this? (I've looked around and can't seem to find anything).

Thanks,

Andrew

EDIT:

I found the solution. You need to add a directive (the general-purpose "~A" worked) for the #\return to be processed:

(loop for i from 0 to 50000 do
        (format t "~A~A         " #\return i))

This will count to 50,000 and you can watch it do it. So, It'll work for any other situation you might want to reuse a single output line.

share|improve this question
2  
@wvxvw: I think he wants to print a return, not a newline. –  Rainer Joswig Oct 16 '12 at 14:38
1  
@andrewm921 please post your answer, accept it and specify which lisp implementation and platform you're using. –  Paulo Madeira Oct 18 '12 at 11:08

2 Answers 2

 (defun show-progress (len)
  (format t "=")
  (dotimes
      (i len)
    (format t "="))
  (format t ">")
 )

After execute this function you should see this output:

CL-USER> (show-progress 10)
===========>
NIL
share|improve this answer
    
Yea, that would work, but if you wanted have it wrap back around (if, say, you're not actually measuring progress but providing a visual distraction) that wouldn't work as well. –  andrewm921 Oct 16 '12 at 3:12
(defun progress-bar ()
  (dotimes (i 100)
    (format t "~a>" (make-string i :initial-element #\=))
    (finish-output)
    (sleep 1)
    (dotimes (j (1+ i))
      (write-char #\Backspace))))

This is how you can print a growing "arrow" on the same line (sending the backspace character as many times as you've printed the equals character will erase it).

Note this will not work in SLIME/SWANK combination because they won't handle "special" characters which could be interpreted as commands, instead they will circumflex-escape them, this one would print as bunches of ^H, but if you run this in terminal, then it will clean the arrow and re-print it.


And this is how you'd do it with formatting the string by repeating the same character:

(defun progress-bar ()
  (dotimes (i 100)
    (format t (format nil "~~1,1,~d,'=:<>~~>" i))
    (finish-output)
    (sleep 1)
    (dotimes (j (1+ i))
      (write-char #\Backspace))))

In case you like more convoluted ways (it is indeed several characters shorter!). And, oh wait, it creates exactly as many strings as the original one... oops :)


Unfortunately, I don't know of a good format directive that would plainly repeat a character, so that the above seems to be the simplest way to do it, however, there are other funny ways to do it efficiently.

(defun progress-bar ()
  (let ((arrow (make-array
                101
                :element-type 'character
                :initial-element #\>
                :fill-pointer 1)))
    (dotimes (i 100)
      (format t arrow)
      (setf (fill-pointer arrow) (+ i 2)
            (aref arrow i) #\=
            (aref arrow (1+ i)) #\>)
      (finish-output)
      (sleep 1)
      (dotimes (j (1+ i))
        (write-char #\Backspace)))))

(defun progress-bar ()
  (let (source)
    (dotimes (i 100)
      (format t "~{~c~}>" source)
      (push #\= source)
      (finish-output)
      (sleep 1)
      (dotimes (j (1+ i))
        (write-char #\Backspace)))))

for instance.

share|improve this answer
2  
That's not really that good, because you cons up i strings. If you want to be (too?) clever, then you can use a format directive to print i characters. –  Rainer Joswig Oct 16 '12 at 14:40

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.