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I'm trying to find out the best way to write my code for better unit testing and such. Currently I have 2 main concerns:

  1. I use the service container to get the service I need within a class method, I'm concerned that this may not be the best way to do it as I rely on those services to be ready first
  2. I also use a main "settings" class which I can access many settings across modules/plugins. I'm also concerned that this creates an unnecessary dependency on this settings

Some sample code to clarify my issues:

class ABC
{
    function someFunction(){
        if(Container::get('settings')->get('status'))
        {
            Container::get('mailer')->send();
        }
    }
}

Perhaps all I should do is to inject these via the constructor method first?

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1  
"Perhaps all I should do is to inject these via the constructor method first?" <- this –  Phil Oct 16 '12 at 3:02
    
this is a problem of to use static methods. Static methods have global scope and is hard to test the function/method. –  Ismael Vacco Oct 16 '12 at 3:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You could to make the folow:

class ABC
{
    private $_setting = null;
    private $_mailer = null;

    public function setSetting($setting)
    {
        $this->_setting = $setting;
    }

    public function getSetting()
    {
        return $this->_setting;
    }

    public function setMailer($mailer)
    {
        $this->_mailer = $mailer;
    }

    public function getMailer()
    {
        return $this->_mailer;
    }

    function someFunction(){
       if($this->_setting->get('status'))
       {
           $this->_mailer->send();
       }
   }
}

class SettingMock
{
     private $_attributes = array();

     public function setMock($attribute, $value)
     {
         $this->_attributes[$attribute] = $value; 
     }
     public function get($attribute)
     {
         return $this->_attributes[$attribute];
     }

}

class MailerMock
{
    private $_values = array();

    public function setValue($value)
    {
        $this->_values['return'] = $value;
    }

    public function send()
    {
        return $this->_values['return'];
    }
}

The test class:

class FooTest extends PHPUnit_Framework_TestCase
{
    public function testSendMail()
    {
         $settingMock = new SettingMock();
         $settingMock->setMock('status', true);

         $mailerMock = new MailerMock();
         $mailerMock->setValue(true);

         $testObject = new ABC();
         $testObject->setSetting($settingMock);
         $testObject->setMailer($mailerMock);

         $return = $testObject->someFunction();
         $this->assertTrue($return);
    }
}
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Your service container looks as it is the service locator anti-pattern. While service locator itself might be useful in rare cases, it always is a major obstacle when writing testable (and maintanable) code:

  • it's hard (if not impossible) to mock it due to its global/static nature
  • it hides component dependencies, thus affecting code readability
  • it introduces tight coupling between consumer code and itself

While some of those issues can be resolved, it is not worth doing so. Your intuition was right on track as usual way of dealing with it is to refactor it into proper DI pattern, like constructor injection.

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