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newbie question again.

Let's say i have a list of nested dictionaries.

a = [{"value1": 1234, "value2": 23423423421, "value3": norway, "value4": charlie},
     {"value1": 1398, "value2": 23423412221, "value3": england, "value4": alpha},
     {"value1": 1234, "value2": 23234231221, "value3": norway, "value4": charlie},
     {"value1": 1398, "value2": 23423213121, "value3": england, "value4": alpha}]

What i want is to move a singularis entry of each duplicate where value1, value3 and value4 matches. The result should be looking like this:

b = [{"value1": 1398, "value2": 23423412221, "value3": england, "value4": alpha},
     {"value1": 1234, "value2": 23234231221, "value3": norway, "value4": charlie}]

The orginal list, a, should remain in it's orginal state.

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How do you define two directories being duplicates? All their values being equal or just the "value1" or...? –  Grzegorz Oledzki Aug 17 '09 at 22:06
    
Nevermind, i solved it. How do i delete it :) –  Jonas Aug 17 '09 at 22:06
    
You don't. You post your answer so others can benefit. –  Nick Presta Aug 17 '09 at 22:08
    
Ofcourse, i will. Gimme a few seconds. –  Jonas Aug 17 '09 at 22:08
1  
"Let's say i have a list of nested dictionaries." Your example is a simple list of simple dictionaries. Nothing is nested. Please either provide an example with "nested" dictionaries, or remove the word "nested". It's confusing when the words do not match the example code. –  S.Lott Aug 18 '09 at 1:07
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1 Answer

There was a similar question on this recently. Try this entry.

In fact, you asked that question: "Let's say there exists multiple entries where value3 and value4 are identical to other nested dictionaries. How can i quick and easy find and remove those duplicate dictionaries."

It sounds like the same thing, right?

Edit: liberally stealing Alex's code, it looks something like this:

import itertools
import pprint
import operator

alpha, charlie, norway, england = range(4)

a = [{"value1": 1234, "value2": 23423423421, "value3": norway, "value4": charlie},
     {"value1": 1398, "value2": 23423412221, "value3": england, "value4": alpha}, 
     {"value1": 1234, "value2": 23234231221, "value3": norway, "value4": charlie}, 
     {"value1": 1398, "value2": 23423213121, "value3": england, "value4": alpha}]


getvals = operator.itemgetter('value1', 'value3', 'value4')

a.sort(key=getvals)

b = [g.next() for _, g in itertools.groupby(a, getvals)]
pprint.pprint(b)

And the result is:

[{'value1': 1234, 'value2': 23423423421L, 'value3': 2, 'value4': 1},
 {'value1': 1398, 'value2': 23423412221L, 'value3': 3, 'value4': 0}]
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Yes :) stupid of me. –  Jonas Aug 17 '09 at 22:10
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