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I'm trying to write a function to fill an array with 40 random uppercase letters. I attempted to fill the array and print it but I'm not getting any output.

Thank you in advance.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

void fillS1(char y[]);

int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{
char s1[40];
int n;

fillS1(&s1[40]);

for (n = 0; n < 41; n++) {
    printf("%s", s1);
}


return 0;
}

void fillS1(char y[40]){

int x = 1;

while (x < 41) {
    x = rand() % 26;
    x = 2 + 'A';
    x = y[x];
    x++;
}


}
share|improve this question
    
Use printf("%s\n", s1); to print s1. –  Basile Starynkevitch Oct 16 '12 at 5:10
2  
Considering 'A' is 65 on most systems, you're probably going out of bounds very quickly seeing as how you add 2 to that and then use it as the index in a length 40 array. Even if x just had the values of the loop, you're still starting at 1 and going to 40 when arrays start at 0 and go to n-1. –  chris Oct 16 '12 at 5:10
1  
And you're immediately throwing away that lovely rand() you generated. Well, maybe not-so-lovely and not-so-rand, as srand() is never called. –  WhozCraig Oct 16 '12 at 5:12
    
Basile, I took your advice and my output was: /n/n/n/n/n/n/n/n/n/n/n/n/n/n/n/n/n/n/n/n/n/n/n/n (ect). –  user1681673 Oct 16 '12 at 5:16
    
It is a backslash \ not a slash / –  Basile Starynkevitch Oct 16 '12 at 5:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would just code

void fill_string_40(char str[])
{
   for (int i=0; i<40; i++)
     str[i] = 'A' + random() % 26;
   str[40] = (char)0;
}

and use it as (e.g. in your main)

{ char s[41];
  fill_string_40(s);
  printf("%s\n", s);
}

Notice that you need an extra byte for the null terminating character. Ad we are assuming some ASCII compatible char encoding. A more portable way could have been

str[i] = "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ"[random() % 26];

since literal strings are constant arrays of chars.

share|improve this answer
    
Why use 42 when storing 41 values? Actually 42 makes sense if storing 41 values as the OP does, but you only store 40. –  Jim Balter Oct 16 '12 at 5:20
    
Because 42 is even -- I have no idea why that's relevant. I would made it a multiple of 8 (the size of a word) -- nor that. Make it what the requirements and logic demand of it. –  Jim Balter Oct 16 '12 at 5:24
    
"I'm declaring s of size 48 because that is usually a multiple of the word size" -- What the heck does that have to do with anything? The compiler is perfectly capable of aligning things for efficiency if there's some point to it. –  Jim Balter Oct 16 '12 at 5:25
    
This is perfect, but it doesn't need to be printed 40 times. lol. –  user1681673 Oct 16 '12 at 5:29
    
It is not printed 40 times, the calling block is supposed to be e.g. in the main –  Basile Starynkevitch Oct 16 '12 at 5:30

Try this, and don't forget to call srand() in the beginning of your program somewhere, ONCE.

void fillRand(char ar[], size_t len)
{
    size_t i=0;
    if (0 == len)
        return;

    for (i=0;i<(len-1);++i)
       ar[i] = (rand() % 26) + 'A';
    ar[len-1] = 0;
}       

BTW, totally not portable, as the spec does not call for 'A'..'Z' to be either sequential or contiguous, but it will probably work fine for what you need. If absolute portability was required, then the following will always work:

void fillRand(char ar[], size_t len)
{
    static const char a[] = "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ";
    size_t i=0;

    if (0 == len)
        return;

    for (i=0;i<(len-1);++i)
       ar[i] = a[ (rand() % (sizeof(a)-1)) ];
    ar[len-1] = 0;
}       

Will work on both normal and EBCDIC platforms. (if you don't know the difference, just use this one).

share|improve this answer

Also, you should pass address of first char while calling fillS1(). Replace fillS1(&s1[40]); with fillS1(&s1[0]);

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