Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Lately I've been using loops with large numbers to print out "Hello world": (sorry for the bad formatting)

    int counter = 0;

    while(true) {
        //loop for ~5 seconds
        for(int i = 0; i < 2147483647 ; i++) {
            //another loop because it's 2012 and PCs have gotten considerably faster :)
            for(int j = 0; j < 2147483647 ; j++){

            }
        }
        System.out.println(counter + ". Hello World!");
        counter++;
    }

}

I understand that this is a very silly way to do it, but I've never used any timer libraries in Java yet. How would one modify the above to print every say 3 seconds?

share|improve this question

13 Answers 13

up vote 23 down vote accepted

You can also take a look at Timer and TimerTask classes which you can use to schedule your task to run every n seconds.

You need a class that extends TimerTask and override the public void run() method, which will be executed everytime you pass an instance of that class to timer.schedule() method..

Here's an example, which prints Hello World every 5 seconds: -

class SayHello extends TimerTask {
    public void run() {
       System.out.println("Hello World!"); 
    }
 }

 // And From your main() method or any other method
 Timer timer = new Timer();
 timer.schedule(new SayHello(), 0, 5000);
share|improve this answer
1  
Note that the 2-param schedule method will execute once after the specified delay. The 3-param schedule or scheduleAtFixedRate would need to be used. –  Tim Bender Feb 14 at 18:42
    
@TimBender Ah! Thanks buddy. It's surprising how this answer stayed hidden till now, and no one pointed that issue. –  Rohit Jain Feb 14 at 18:42
1  
lol, yeah. Sometimes I get up-votes on answers and I go look to find that my own understanding has improved since I last muddled through providing a solution. –  Tim Bender Feb 14 at 18:43
    
@TimBender Just wondering whether OP really got his task done with this ;) Anyways, now I would prefer to use ExecutorService for these tasks. That is really a big improvement over traditional Thread API. Just didn't used it at the time of answering. –  Rohit Jain Feb 14 at 18:44

The easiest way would be to set the main thread to sleep 3000 milliseconds (3 seconds):

for(int i = 0; i< 10; i++) {
    try {
        //sending the actual Thread of execution to sleep X milliseconds
        Thread.sleep(3000);
    } catch(InterruptedException ie) {}
    System.out.println("Hello world!"):
}

This will stop the thread at least X milliseconds. The thread could be sleeping more time, but that's up to the JVM. The only thing guaranteed is that the thread will sleep at least those milliseconds. Take a look at the Thread#sleep doc:

Causes the currently executing thread to sleep (temporarily cease execution) for the specified number of milliseconds, subject to the precision and accuracy of system timers and schedulers.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @Luiggi. Java will always make sure it's 3000 ms no matter what machine (CPU) I run it on right? –  meiryo Oct 16 '12 at 6:02
2  
@meiryo : no it won't –  Nandkumar Tekale Oct 16 '12 at 6:03
3  
@meiryo It will stop the thread at least X milliseconds. The thread could be sleeping more time, but that's up to the JVM. The only thing guaranteed is that the thread will sleep at least those milliseconds. –  Luiggi Mendoza Oct 16 '12 at 6:04
2  
Caveat: if this is not a real time system, the sleep will be at least 3000 ms, but could be longer. If you want exactly 3000 ms sleep especially where human life is at risk (medical instruments, controlling planes etc.) you should use a real time operating system. –  Kinjal Dixit Oct 16 '12 at 6:08
1  
@meiryo : Luiggi and kinjal explained very well :) –  Nandkumar Tekale Oct 16 '12 at 6:10

Add Thread.sleep

try {
        Thread.sleep(3000);
    } catch(InterruptedException ie) {}
share|improve this answer

Use Thread.sleep(3000) inside for looop

share|improve this answer

If you want to do a periodic task, use a ScheduledExecutorService. Specifically ScheduledExecutorService.scheduleAtFixedRate

The code:

Runnable helloRunnable = new Runnable() {
    public void run() {
        System.out.println("Hello world");
    }
};

ScheduledExecutorService executor = Executors.newScheduledThreadPool(1);
executor.scheduleAtFixedRate(helloRunnable, 0, 3, TimeUnit.SECONDS);
share|improve this answer
3  
I hope somebody else upvotes this as well. Thread.sleep() might fit the code in the OP best, but it's a rather amateur reinvention of the wheel. Professional software engineers will use tried and trusted API, such as TimerTask. ScheduledExecutorService is even better, though; refer to Brian Goetz et al.'s Java Concurrency in Practice. The latter class has been around for nearly a decade—it's sad that all these other answers overlook it. –  Michael Scheper Aug 14 '13 at 2:32
1  
@MichaelScheper, Thank you, I'm glad to see that this answer has finally surpassed the TimerTask variant. Interestingly, I noticed that the accepted answer is actually not correct :\ The age of the two APIs aside, ScheduledExecutorService is simply more intuitively declarative. The use of TimeUnit as a parameter makes it much more clear what is occurring. Gone are the days of code like 5*60*1000 // 5 minutes. –  Tim Bender Feb 14 at 18:39
    
@TimBender I noticed you have a 3 for the period argument. I cannot find whether that is in seconds or milliseconds. I would like to have it run every 500 milliseconds (half a second). –  JohnMerlino Jun 20 at 6:10
    
Ahh I see. Fourth argument lets you specify time e.g. TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS. –  JohnMerlino Jun 20 at 6:11

Use java.util.Timer and Timer#schedule(TimerTask,delay,period) method will help you.

public class RemindTask extends TimerTask {
    public void run() {
      System.out.println(" Hello World!");
    }
    public static void main(String[] args){
       Timer timer = new Timer();
       timer.schedule(new RemindTask(), 3000,3000);
    }
  }
share|improve this answer

What he said. You can handle the exceptions however you like, but Thread.sleep(miliseconds); is the best route to take.

public static void main(String[] args) throws InterruptedException {
share|improve this answer

For small applications it is fine to use Timer and TimerTask as Rohit mentioned but in web applications I would use Quartz Scheduler to schedule jobs and to perform such periodic jobs.

See tutorials for Quartz scheduling.

share|improve this answer

I figure it out with a timer, hope it helps. I have used a timer from java.util.Timer and TimerTask from the same package. See below:-

    TimerTask task = new TimerTask() {

        @Override
        public void run() {
            System.out.println("Hello World");
        }
    };

    Timer timer = new Timer();
    timer.schedule(task, new Date(), 3000);

Cheers.

share|improve this answer
public class HelloWorld extends TimerTask{

    public void run() {

        System.out.println("Hello World");
    }
}


public class PrintHelloWorld {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Timer timer = new Timer();
        timer.schedule(new HelloWorld(), 0, 5000);

        while (true) {
            try {
                Thread.sleep(2000);
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                System.out.println("InterruptedException Exception" + e.getMessage());
            }
        }
    }
}

infinite loop is created ad scheduler task is configured You can find Similar kind of example

share|improve this answer
public class TimeDelay{
  public static void main(String args[]) {
    try {
      while (true) {
        System.out.println(new String("Hello world"));
        Thread.sleep(3 * 1000); // every 3 seconds
      }
    } catch (InterruptedException e) {
      e.printStackTrace();
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer

This is the simple way to use thread in java:

for(int i = 0; i< 10; i++) {
    try {
        //sending the actual Thread of execution to sleep X milliseconds
        Thread.sleep(3000);
    } catch(Exception e) {
        System.out.println("Exception : "+e.getMessage());
    }
    System.out.println("Hello world!");
}
share|improve this answer
another simple way using Runnable interface in Thread Constructor so follow below code 
public class Demo {
public static void main(String[] args) {
System.out.println("hi");
Thread t1 = new Thread(new Runnable() {

@Override
public void run() {
// TODO Auto-generated method stub
for(int i=0;i try {
Thread.sleep(3000);
} catch (InterruptedException e) {
// TODO Auto-generated catch block
e.printStackTrace();
}
System.out.println("Thread T1 : "+i);
}
}
});

Thread t2 = new Thread(new Runnable() {

@Override
public void run() {
// TODO Auto-generated method stub
for(int i=0;i try {
Thread.sleep(3000);
} catch (InterruptedException e) {
// TODO Auto-generated catch block
e.printStackTrace();
}
System.out.println("Thread T2 : "+i);
}
}
});


Thread t3 = new Thread(new Runnable() {

@Override
public void run() {
// TODO Auto-generated method stub
for(int i=0;i try {
Thread.sleep(3000);
} catch (InterruptedException e) {
// TODO Auto-generated catch block
e.printStackTrace();
}
System.out.println("Thread T3 : "+i);
}
}
});

t1.start();
t2.start();
t3.start();
}

}

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.