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I am writing a script for MS PowerShell. This script uses the Copy-Item command. One of the optional arguments to this command is "-container". The documentation for the argument states that specifying this argument "Preserves container objects during the copy operation."

This is all well and good, for I would be the last person to want unpreserved container objects during a copy operation. But in all seriousness, what does this argument do? Particularly in the case where I am copying a disk directory tree from one place to another, what difference does this make to the behavior of the Copy-Item command?

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2 Answers

up vote 14 down vote accepted

The container the documentation is talking about is the folder structure. If you are doing a recursive copy and want to preserve the folder structure, you would use the -container switch. (Note: by default the -container switch is set to true, so you really would not need to specify it. If you wanted to turn it off you could use -container: $false.)

There is a catch to this... if you do a directory listing and pipe it to Copy-Item, it will not preserve the folder structure. If you want to preserve the folder structure, you have to specify the -path property and the -recurse switch.

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That is very clear. Thank you! –  Mark Meuer Sep 24 '08 at 20:03
3  
-container is a switch, so it needs : for value passing. -container: $false. –  davor Feb 3 '13 at 15:21
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I too found the documentation less than helpful. I did some tests to see how the -Container parameter works in conjunction with -Recurse when copying files and folders. We see that -Container is equal to -Container: $true. This is the file structure I used for the examples:

#    X:.
#    ├───destination
#    └───source
#        │   source.1.txt
#        │   source.2.txt
#        │
#        └───source.1
#            │   source.1.1.txt
#            │   source.1.2.txt
#            │
#            └───source.1.1
  • For all examples, the current location (pwd) is X:\.
  • I used PowerShell 4.0.

1) To copy just the source folder without any children (empty folder):

#    X:.
#    ├───destination
#    │   └───source
#    └───source (...)
Copy-Item -Path source -Destination .\destination
Copy-Item -Path source -Destination .\destination -Container
Copy-Item -Path source -Destination .\destination -Container: $true

This gives an error:

# Exception: Container cannot be copied to another container. 
#            The -Recurse or -Container parameter is not specified.
Copy-Item -Path source -Destination .\destination -Container: $false

2) To copy the source folder with all children (files and folders) at all levels, preserving the hierarchy:

#    X:.
#    ├───destination
#    │   └───source
#    │       │   source.1.txt
#    │       │   source.2.txt
#    │       │
#    │       └───source.1
#    │           │   source.1.1.txt
#    │           │   source.1.2.txt
#    │           │
#    │           └───source.1.1
#    └───source (...)
Copy-Item -Path source -Destination .\destination -Recurse
Copy-Item -Path source -Destination .\destination -Recurse -Container
Copy-Item -Path source -Destination .\destination -Recurse -Container: $true

3) To copy all children (files and folders) at all levels WITHOUT preserving the hierarchy:

#    X:.
#    ├───destination
#    │   │   source.1.1.txt
#    │   │   source.1.2.txt
#    │   │   source.1.txt
#    │   │   source.2.txt
#    │   │
#    │   ├───source.1
#    │   └───source.1.1
#    └───source (...)
Copy-Item -Path source -Destination .\destination -Recurse -Container: $false
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